Selah Marley Pops Into BKLYN Studios May 3-4, 2019 With 'A Primordial Place'

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Selah Marley Pops Into BKLYN Studios May 3-4, 2019 With 'A Primordial Place'

Selah Marley opens an art quickie ‘A Primordial Place’ , on view at BKLYN Studios In New York City from May 3rd until May 4th, noon to 8pm. BKLYN Studios is located at 445 Albee Square West, Brooklyn NY 11201 in Citypoint.

Jeneil Williams + Grace Mahary By Delphine Diallo In Africa Motherland For Vogue Portugal

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Jeneil Williams + Grace Mahary By Delphine Diallo In Africa Motherland For Vogue Portugal

Model Jeneil Williams is center stage with Grace Mahary weighing in for ‘Africa Motherland’, styled by Melaney Oldenhof. Jeneil and Grace are channeling the Omo Valley people — a bedrock inspiration for Anne of Carversville and GlamTribal due to their 1) beauty and affinity to nature and 2) their location in southern Ethiopia, bordering the northern border of Lake Turkana.

This precious land is believed to be the foundation of humanity: ALL PEOPLE. Except for a few white nationalists, the 1970 theories about separate lines of human development happening independently of each other have not withstood scientific scrutiny. All humans first migrated out of Africa and 98% of scientists agree.

Brooklyn-based, French-Senegalese photographer Delphine Diallo is behind the lens for ‘Africa Motherland’ in Vogue Portugal’s entire April 2019 issue devoted to Africa.

The Omo Valley's Surma + Mursi Tribes, Vintage 2008, In Hans Silvester's Own Words

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The Omo Valley's Surma + Mursi Tribes, Vintage 2008, In Hans Silvester's Own Words

As a design person, no book has influenced me more in life than Hans Silvester’s 2008 book ‘Natural Fashion, Tribal Decoration from Africa.’ His images of members of the Surma and Mursi tribes, the product of 12 trips into the isolated Omo Valley in southern Ethiopia, have become legendary.

Many of the people commenting on on the Silvester images don’t own the book and have not seen them in art galleries. I fear that much of their original meaning and importance is being lost in the muck, so to speak. For this reason, I want to attach Hans Silvester’s own words to the images, and this is my first effort. ~ Anne

Criminals Will Not Leave 500,000 Tons Of Woolly Mammoth Ivory Tusks Buried In Arctic

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Criminals Will Not Leave 500,000 Tons Of Woolly Mammoth Ivory Tusks Buried In Arctic

The upcoming CITIES conference, taking place in Sri Lanka from May 23 to June 3 and attended by 183 countries, will consider the Israeli proposal to give protection status to the woolly mammoth, a species extinct for 10,000 years.

Supporters of the Israeli proposal argue that affording the prehistoric mammoth Appendix II protection under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES)could play a vital role in saving elephants who are being poached at the rate of around 30,000 animals a year.

Many argue that banning woolly mammoth ivory will only drive the excavation of woolly mammoth ivory into organized crime syndicates. A ban on woolly mammoth ivory will surely drive up the price of ivory, making it impossible to believe that the estimated 500,000 tons of mammoth tusks buried in the Arctic will remain there untouched.

EYE: Gucci Denies Black Community Boycott Is Slowing Sales | Leigh Bowery Inspired Sweater

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EYE: Gucci Denies Black Community Boycott Is Slowing Sales | Leigh Bowery Inspired Sweater

Kering's chief financial officer Jean-Marc Duplaix rejected the notion that the blackface scandal played a determining role in Gucci's recent sales slowdown. Per ‘Business of Fashion’, "He dismissed the idea that backlash against a balaclava sweater widely criticized for resembling blackface had hurt sales."

Still — when growth slows some and the word ‘boycott’ is being called for by Oscar-winning director Spike Lee — a smart person takes the situation very seriously. 50 Cent immediately posted a video of himself burning his Gucci clothing, and Soulja Boy covered up the forehead tattoo that was once an ode to the brand, writes Complex.

"Gucci's done," Soulja said before being asked if he planned to ditch his collection of Gucci pieces. "Nah, we ain't gon' return it...I'll just give it to charity."

Dams Can Mimic The Free Flow Of Rivers, But Risks Must Be Managed

Dams Can Mimic The Free Flow Of Rovers, But Risks Must Be Managed

In recent decades, humans have built many dams. These are designed to regulate flow for irrigation, hydropower and water supply. Most major rivers in the world are dammed.

But there are detriments to damming rivers. Many people depend on the natural ebb and flow of unrestricted rivers that swell with water in the rainy season and wane in the dry season. When the natural flow is changed, people and ecosystems are affected: globally, an estimated 472 million people living downstream of dams have suffered adverse effects from changes to the rivers’ flows.

Muslims Arrived In America 400 Years Ago As Part of the Slave Trade and Today Are Vastly Diverse

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Muslims Arrived In America 400 Years Ago As Part of the Slave Trade and Today Are Vastly Diverse

Most Americans say they don’t know a Muslim and that much of what they understand about Islam is from the media.

It’s not surprising then to see the many misunderstandings that exist about Muslims. Some see them as outsiders and a threat to the American way of life and values. President Donald Trump’s controversial policy to impose a ban on Muslims from seven countries entering into the United States played into such fears.

What many don’t know, however, is that Muslims have been in America well before America became a nation. In fact, some of the earliest arrivals to this land were Muslim immigrants – forcibly transported as slaves in the transatlantic trade, whose 400th anniversary is being observed this year.

Safari Tourism May Make Elephants More Aggressive – But It’s Still the Best Tool for Conservation

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Safari Tourism May Make Elephants More Aggressive – But It’s Still the Best Tool for Conservation

By Isabelle Szott, PhD Candidate in Conservation Biology, Liverpool John Moores University and Nicola F. Koyama, Senior Lecturer in Natural Sciences and Psychology, Liverpool John Moores University. First published on The Conversation.

Going on safari in Africa offers tourists the opportunity to see some of the most spectacular wildlife on Earth – including African elephants (Loxodonta africana). Known for their complex social systemslong memory and high intelligence, this species is also threatened by poaching and shrinking habitats, so further disturbance to their precarious existence could have serious consequences.

Wildlife tourism can help protect these animals and their habitat by generating income for conservation and providing stable work in local economies. Countries such as South Africa and Kenya receive two to five million visitors to protected areas each year, generating receipts of up to USD$90m. But as it becomes more popular worldwide, it’s worth remembering that we often don’t know how tourism affects the animals we observe.