Smithsonian Acquires Tyler Mitchell's Beyoncé Portrait for Vogue US September 2018

Smithsonian Acquires Tyler Mitchell's Beyoncé Portrait for Vogue US September 2018

Photographer Tyler Mitchell shares a spectacular piece of news about an image from his September 2018 Beyoncé cover editorial. In an embarrassing acknowledgement of racism in the fashion industry, Mitchell became the first African American photographer to shoot the cover of Vogue in its 125-year history.

Clearly, positive energy infused Mitchell’s editorial from every direction, so much so that one of his Vogue images has been acquired into the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery’s permanent collection in Washington, D.C.

The selected photo sees Beyoncé on location just outside of London, wearing a sequin-covered Valentino dress and exuberant Philip Treacy London headpiece.

“A year ago today we broke the flood gates open,” Mitchell wrote of the news on Instagram. “Since then, it was important to spend the whole year running through them making sure every piece of the gate was knocked down.”

As a concerned photographer, who is socially and politically engaged, Mitchell sees the Beyoncé shoot as an empowerment opportunity

“We’ve been thingified physically, sexually, emotionally. With my work I’m looking to revitalize and elevate the black body.”

We share the entire editorial in celebration of Mitchell’s growing success, Queen Bey herself, and the New Day society global citizens desire.

Rihanna Talks Being First Black Woman In Charge Of Major Luxury Fashion House For T Magazine June 2019

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Rihanna Talks Being First Black Woman In Charge Of Major Luxury Fashion House For T Magazine June 2019

The New York Times T Magazine June 2019 previewed Rihanna’s now open FENTY Collection, produced with her business partner LVMH. Key FENTY looks are styled here by Suzanne Koller for images by Kristin-Lee Moolman. / Hair by Yusef Williams; makeup by Lauren Parsons

In this next act of Rihanna’s journey, the pop star becomes the first black woman in charge of a major luxury fashion house in Paris.

Rihanna is interviewed by Jeremy O. Harris, an American actor and playwright, known for his plays ‘Daddy’ and ‘Slave Play’. This is no ordinary, glossy interview. Harris writes:

“For three years, I have been a diligent student of Rihanna’s 2016 song “Work.” The first lesson it taught me was in the fine art of ubiquity: The omnipresent earworm hovered over casual intimacies, significant encounters, mundane journeys and made sense of itself wherever, in whatever crevices it chose. Then “Work” found its way into my own work. In my script for “Slave Play,” which debuted at New York Theater Workshop in 2018, the protagonist Kaneisha suffers from obsessive-compulsive disorder and Rihanna’s “Work” plays in her head on repeat, taking on a frighteningly oppressive quality and revealing the historic bedrock I was attempting to excavate: namely, that black people, specifically women, must live with the knowledge that their emotional and physical labor is the backbone of every relationship that they endeavor to have with their partners, with America. The song, which weaves through the dialogue, brought more attention to the play than any other device could have. “

EYE: Debra Shaw + Mowalola Ogunlesi Talk Blackness In Fashion Industry For Dazed Magazine SS2019

Debra Shaw wears Mowalolo Ogunlesi in images by Campbell Addy for Dazed Magazine SS2019

Debra Shaw wears Mowalolo Ogunlesi in images by Campbell Addy for Dazed Magazine SS2019

Model icon Debra Shaw is styled by Emma Wyman in ‘Debra Shaw: Deliverance, lensed by Campbell Addy for Dazed Magazine Spring/Summer 2019. / Hair by Tomohiro Ohashi; makeup by Ammy Drammeh

Shaw wears designs by British-Nigerian breakout designer Mowalola Ogunlesi, who also conducts the interview.

Philadelphia-born, New Jersey-raised Shaw reflects on her Alexander McQueen AW96 Dante show walk, where she stuck out her tongue directly to the audience. Shaw was wearing a gothic mask emblazoned with a crucifix. Her Spring 1997 McQueen appearance was even more memorable.

EYE: Gucci Denies Black Community Boycott Is Slowing Sales | Leigh Bowery Inspired Sweater

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EYE: Gucci Denies Black Community Boycott Is Slowing Sales | Leigh Bowery Inspired Sweater

Kering's chief financial officer Jean-Marc Duplaix rejected the notion that the blackface scandal played a determining role in Gucci's recent sales slowdown. Per ‘Business of Fashion’, "He dismissed the idea that backlash against a balaclava sweater widely criticized for resembling blackface had hurt sales."

Still — when growth slows some and the word ‘boycott’ is being called for by Oscar-winning director Spike Lee — a smart person takes the situation very seriously. 50 Cent immediately posted a video of himself burning his Gucci clothing, and Soulja Boy covered up the forehead tattoo that was once an ode to the brand, writes Complex.

"Gucci's done," Soulja said before being asked if he planned to ditch his collection of Gucci pieces. "Nah, we ain't gon' return it...I'll just give it to charity."

IMAN Talks Models Of Color In Fashion With Porter Edit Oct. 26, 2018: We've Come A Long Way, Baby

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IMAN Talks Models Of Color In Fashion With Porter Edit Oct. 26, 2018: We've Come A Long Way, Baby

Porter Edit’s October 26 2018 issue turns its focus on supermodel, makeup entrepreneur, humanitarian and champion of black women’s rights: IMAN. Tracy Taylor styles the fashion icon in trench coats and utilitarian suitings from Michael Kors, Victoria Beckham, Joseph, Chloe and more for images by Hanna Tveite.

Jane Mulkerrings conducts the interview that touches on many topics from IMAN’s discovery by legendary photographer Peter Beard to her constant grief over the loss of her husband David Bowie.

It’s her focus on the fashion industry and her own activism on behalf of models of color that demands our focus, educating even me on the activism of IMAN, Bethann Hardison and Naomi Campbell’s launching of a campaign in September 2013 to force a reckoning over the dearth of models of color on the catwalk.

At AOC we see this pace of a primary place for models of color in the fashion industry escalating dramatically in 2017-2018. IMAN is totally correct is affirming that the changes are not only visible but blindingly so. It’s dazzling, frankly. Nobody gets a gold star for taking what was the right path all along. Nevertheless, the changes are breathtaking and a moment of joy for me personally as a citizen of Trumplandia.

AOC Women of Color Model Archives

Is the Entrenched Dominance of White Fashion Models Ending?

The Observer UK reports that as Condé Nast prepares to launch GQ China and Vogue India increases its print run to 50,000 copies a month, the demand for a new face of fashion is in the works, one that will be transforming.

Model Padma LakshmiPaula Karaiskos, of leading British model agency Storm Model Management, thinks that the distinct look provided by Asian models will ensure longevity and success.

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