adidas by Stella McCartney Unveils Fully Sustainable 'Infinite Hoodie' + 'Biofabric Tennis Dress'

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adidas by Stella McCartney Unveils Fully Sustainable 'Infinite Hoodie' + 'Biofabric Tennis Dress'

Stella McCartney and adidas continue their march towards sustainable production with two new concept garments: the ‘Infinite Hoodie’ and the ‘Biofabric Tennis Dress’.

“Fashion is one of the most harmful industries to the environment,” said Stella McCartney in a statement. “We can’t wait any longer to search for answers and alternatives. By creating a truly open approach to solving the problem of textile waste, we can help empower the industry at large to bring more sustainable practices into reality. With adidas by Stella McCartney we’re creating high performance products that also safeguard the future of the planet.”

Stella McCartney Talks Sustainability, Lensed By Matthew Sprout For Porter Edit June 21, 2019

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Stella McCartney Talks Sustainability, Lensed By Matthew Sprout For Porter Edit June 21, 2019

Eco-fashion, sustainability leader Stella McCartney is styled by Hannah Cole in ‘The Fashion Revolution’, lensed by Matthew Sprout for Porter Edit June 21, 2019.

Emma Sells meets the woman on a mission, and we must listen up. Unlike designers finally taking notice of the almost unbearable toll that the fashion industry is putting on our planet, Stella McCartney has been all-in for Gaia from day one of her fashion career.

Central Saint Martins Student Mi Zhou Creates Gorgeous Toiletry Packaging Made of Soap

Central Saint Martins Student Mi Zhou Creates Gorgeous Toiletry Packaging Made of Soap

Central Saint Martins student Mi Zhou, a student in the premier design school’s Material Futures master’s degree program has brilliantly re-imagined the wasteful, earth-harming reality of most toiletry packaging by turning the vessels themselves into usable products. Zhou’s lotion, soap, and shampoo containers are made of soap.

Net-a-Porter Launches Net Sustain With 26 Brands, Big Plans + Beauty Coming Soon

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Net-a-Porter Launches Net Sustain With 26 Brands, Big Plans + Beauty Coming Soon

Online luxury retailer Net-a-Porter has joined the effort to promote significant changes in the apparel industry, with the launch of Net Sustain.

The platform is launching with 26 brands and over 500 products that meet core sustainability criteria determined by Net-a-Porter. The criteria ranges from "considered materials and processes to reducing waste in their supply chain, taking into account human, animal and environmental welfare and aligning with internationally recognized best practices in the fashion and beauty industries."

Prada Goes Fur Free In All Company Brands Starting With Spring 2020 Collections

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Prada Goes Fur Free In All Company Brands Starting With Spring 2020 Collections

Italian luxury Prada is joining the ranks of fur-free luxury brands, announcing that all collections starting with women’s spring/summer 2020 will not use fur. Prada previously used fur from foxes, minks and rabbits in its luxury collections.

The decision comes after working closely with the Humane Society International, Fur Free Alliance, and Italian animal rights group LAV. Prada’s subsidiary Miu Miu is on the same fur-free spring 2020 timetable. Products that have already been produced will be sold.

All-You-Can-Eat Food Packaging Could Soon Be On The Menu

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All-You-Can-Eat Food Packaging Could Soon Be On The Menu

By Sylvain Charlebois, Professor in Food Distribution and Policy, Dalhousie University. First published on The Conversation.

Within a year, single-use plastics and excess packaging have become Public Enemy No. 1.

A recent Greenpeace-led audit looked at the companies behind the waste lining Canadian waterways. Much of the plastic trash cleaned up from Canadian shorelines this fall was traceable to five companies: Nestlé, Tim Hortons, PepsiCo, the Coca-Cola Company and McDonald’s. All these companies are part of the food industry, which is hardly surprising.

With consumers looking for convenience and portable food solutions, this problem will not go away anytime soon. In fact, it could get worse if nothing is done.

Compostable containers

In the food industry, conversations about green supply chains focus on compostable and even edible solutions. Plenty of technologies exist.

On the compostable front, we have come a long way in just a few years. In 2010, PepsiCo Canada came out with the first compostable chip bag for SunChips. This new package was meant to completely break down into compost in a hot, active compost pile in approximately 14 weeks. Some tests concluded that it did not.

When Biodegradable Plastic Is Not Biodegradable -- Only To A Degree

When Biodegradable Plastic Is Not Biodegradable -- Only To A Degree

The idea of a “biodegradable” plastic suggests a material that would degrade to little or nothing over a period of time, posing less of a hazard to wildlife and the environment. This is the sort of claim often made by plastic manufacturers, yet recent research has revealed supposedly biodegradable plastic bags still intact after three years spent either at sea or buried underground. So un-degraded were these bags that they were still able to hold more than two kilos of shopping.

The study’s authors, Imogen Napper and Richard Thompson at the University of Plymouth, tested compostable, biodegradable, oxo-biodegradable, and conventional polythene plastic bags in three different natural environments: buried in the ground, outdoors exposed to air and sunlight, and submerged in the sea. Not one of the bags broke down completely in all of the environments tested. In particular, the biodegradable bag survived in soil and sea almost unscathed.

Mumbai's Cardboard Cafe Inspires a Deep Dive Into Packaging Pollution In America

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Mumbai's Cardboard Cafe Inspires a Deep Dive Into Packing Pollution In America

Our love for the convenience of Amazon and online shopping generally comes at an environmental cost. Especially in cities, there’s no enough money to educate our children, let alone cart away all the Amazon boxes at taxpayer expense.

Creative minds are asking themselves what we can do with all this cardboard — and Indian design studio NUDES, led by Nuru Karim has answered the challenge with the spectacular Cardboard cafe, located in Mumbai, India.