Celebrating Two New Malawi-Born Daughters, Madonna Releases 'Her-Story' A 12-Minute Film For International Women's Day

Celebrating Two New Malawi-Born Daughters, Madonna Releases 'Her-Story' A 12-Minute Film For International Women's Day

Madonna said her daughters will keep their birth names of Esther and Stella to preserve their identity as Malawians, and a Malawian nanny will travel with the children to the United States to ease their transition, according to the ruling. Her son David Banda and daughter Mercy James are now 11.

Judge Mwale noted that the pop star has raised $7.5 million for her latest project in Malawi, the construction of a pediatric surgery ward at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital in Blantyre. The ward is scheduled to open early next year

Hillary Clinton Returns In Fighting Form Imploring Us To: RESIST, INSIST, PERSIST, ENLIST!

Hillary Clinton speaking in at the Professional Business Women of California’s annual conference in San Francisco, 3/28/17. Vogue photo courtesy of AP

Hillary Clinton speaking in at the Professional Business Women of California’s annual conference in San Francisco, 3/28/17. Vogue photo courtesy of AP

“Obviously, the outcome of the election wasn’t the one I hoped for, worked for, but I will never stop speaking out,” Clinton said on Tuesday night at the Professional Business Women of California’s annual conference in San Francisco. “I am thrilled to be out of the woods, in the company of so many inspiring women.”

Clinton delivered a four-word mantra to the crowd which was focused on women and diversity in the workplace: RESIST, INSIST, PERSIST, ENLIST! Almost five months after the election, Clinton is not only back, but blazing writes Michelle Ruiz for Vogue.  

I'm fighting for a fairer, big-hearted, inclusive America. And the unfinished business of the 21st century can't wait any longer . . . Now is the time to demand the progress we want to see . . . and I'll be right there with you every step of the way."

Clinton criticized Trump for having the fewest number of women in top jobs "in a generation", with four women out of 23 positions. She called out White House press secretary Sean Spicer who told American Urban Radio Networks House correspondent April Ryan "Please, stop shaking your head" during Tuesday's press briefing.  "Too many women have had a lifetime of practice taking this kind of indignity in stride," Clinton said.

Hillary also had choice words regarding Bill O'Reilly's recent comment about Rep. Maxine Waters's (D-Calif) hair. 

The Fox New host called it a "James Brown wig," an insult that some interpreted as racist and sexist. Since Trump's election, Waters has repeatedly blasted the president's rhetoric and agenda.

"One of our own California congressmen Maxine Waters was taunted with a racist joke about her hair," Clinton said on Tuesday. "Too many women, especially women of color, have had a lifetime of practice taking precisely these kinds of indignities in stride."

"But why should we have to?" she said. "And any woman who thinks this couldn’t be directed at her is living in a dream world."

Clinton called on Silicon Valley to improve diversity and inclusion, particularly by introducing paid parental leave policies. 

“These are not buzzwords to throw around or boxes to check,” Clinton said. “A crucial part of solving these problems is recognizing that, important as it is, corporate feminism is no substitute for inclusive concrete solutions that improve life for women everywhere.”

In Ruiz' words: "She's back, and here's hoping she is as nasty a woman as ever!"

Fearless Girl's Standoff With Wall Street's Charging Bull Will Continue Thru February 2018

The standoff between 'Fearless Girl' and Wall Street's Charging Bull will continue for another year. With large numbers of New Yorkers seeking a permanent home for 'Fearless Girl', New York Mayor de Blasio's office gave her a lease through February 2018.

“In her short time here, the Fearless Girl has fueled powerful conversations about women in leadership and inspired so many,” de Blasio said in a statement. “Now, she’ll be asserting herself and affirming her strength even after her temporary permit expires — a fitting path for a girl who refuses to quit.”

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London Artist Lynette Yiadom-Boakye's Brings Vibrant Paintings Of Black Experience To New York's New Museum

'To Douse the Devil for a Ducat', 2015, oil on canvasCourtesy of Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, Jack Shainman Gallery, New York, and Corvi-Mora, London

'To Douse the Devil for a Ducat', 2015, oil on canvasCourtesy of Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, Jack Shainman Gallery, New York, and Corvi-Mora, London

Vogue.com profiles London artist Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, whose work will be shown from May 3-2017 thru September 9-2017 at New York's New Museum. The museum's artistic director, Massimiliano Gioni, who featured her work in his 2013 Venice Biennale, says that her work has a particular urgency. 

 “In a moment of racial tension like the one America has been living through, Lynette’s characters take on a completely different weight and presence,” he says. “It’s hard not to feel implicated as a viewer—I can’t help thinking that her imagined characters are engaging with me.”

These powerful paintings of black women and men -- all of them fictional -- are increasingly influential in contemporary culture. Yiadom-Boakye was shortlisted for the 2013 Turner Prize and comes to New York after solo exhibitions at the Serpentine Gallery in London, the Haus der Kunst in Munich, and the Kunsthalle in Basel.

The artist Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, photographed in her London studio, paints fast, timeless portraits in oils. Her solo show at the New Museum in New York opens this May.Photographed by Anton Corbijn,  Vogue , April 2017

The artist Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, photographed in her London studio, paints fast, timeless portraits in oils. Her solo show at the New Museum in New York opens this May.Photographed by Anton Corbijn, Vogue, April 2017

One wonders if Lynette Yiadom-Boakye can offer insights into the current intellectual chaos whirling around Dana Schutz' 'Open Casket' painting of Emmett Till, part of the Whitney Bienniale

Can A White Cube Museum & Conference Center In Lusanga Redress Economic Inequality In The Democratic Republic Of Congo?

A RENDERING OF THE WHITE CUBE IN LUSANGA (IMAGE: © OMA)

A RENDERING OF THE WHITE CUBE IN LUSANGA (IMAGE: © OMA)

Can A White Cube Museum & Conference Center In Lusanga Redress Economic Inequality In The Democratic Republic Of Congo?

With the establishment of LIRCAEI, the iconic modernist White Cube will be recontextualized in the setting that has historically underwritten its development. In economic terms, plantations have funded not just the building of most European and American infrastructure and industries, but also that of museums and universities. On an ideological level, the violence and brutality unfolding on one side—the plantation zones—has informed and haunted the civility, taste and aesthetics championed at the other: the White Cubes. By colliding these two opposite poles of global value chains with each other, LIRCAEI aims to overcome both the monoculture of the plantation system—that exhausts people and the environment and the sterility of the White Cube—a free haven for critique, love, and singularity, that, more often than not, reaffirms class divides.

A RENDERING OF THE WHITE CUBE IN LUSANGA (IMAGE: © OMA)

A RENDERING OF THE WHITE CUBE IN LUSANGA (IMAGE: © OMA)