Celine Creative Director Hedi Slimane Captures Marland Backus In Winter 1 2019 Collection

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Celine Creative Director Hedi Slimane Captures Marland Backus In Winter 1 2019 Collection

Model Marland Backus is lensed by Hedi Simane in images for Celine’s Winter 1 2019 Collection. Sarah Mower described Slimane’s third Celine collection in glowing words for Vogue.com:

There have been all sorts of jokes about “old Celine” since Hedi Slimane took over. But in his third showing for the house, this—and everything that followed—was his turning of the tables. This was old, old Celine—exactly the kind of politely classy merchandise originally sold under the label before LVMH acquired it, long before even Phoebe Philo’s predecessor, Michael Kors, was drafted to make runway shows out of it.

In our time of so much fashion, this was Slimane’s moment to iterate, and reiterate, his version of French fashion from a time of nonfashion—a niche of Parisian upper- and middle-class style that he must have understood from being a boy growing up in France. In a way it was exactly what Slimane has always done—taking the subject of a seam of preexisting street style and drilling into it for all it’s worth.

Marland Backus Wears Industrial Transparency Lensed By David Duran For Models.com

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Brooklyn model and industrial designer Marland Backus, a frequent muse with edge for brands like Balenciaga and Gucci, fronts a striking new editorial for Models.com. Stylist Woo Lee curates the collection of floating silhouettes constructed with industrial, androgynous attitude, mixed with pieces from the model's own jewelry line. PhotographerDavid Duran is in the studio delivering images that punch out every detail. 

Eye: Katja Mayer Captures The Patriarchal Contradiction in 'Melancholia' For Numéro December 2017

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Katja Mayer Captures The Patriarchal Contradiction in 'Melancholia' For Numéro December 2017

Model Marland Backus feels the 'Melancholia' in images styled by Samuel FrancoisPhotographer and artist Katja Mayer captures the provocation for Numéro's December 2017 issue.

The obelisks of ancient Egypt represented the benben, the primordial mound upon which the god Atum stood at the creation of the world. As such, they were associated with the benu bird, the Egyptian precursor to the Greek phoenix. According to some Egyptian myths the benu bird was the first living creature whose cry awoke creation and set life in motion. The bird was linked to the morning star and the renewal of each day but was also the sign of the end of the world; in the same way the bird had cried to begin the creative cycle, she would sound again to signal its completion. via

Seaton Schroeder, an engineer who helped bring Cleopatra's need to Central Park recounts:  “From the carvings on its face we read of an age anterior to most events recorded in ancient history; Troy had not fallen, Homer was not born, Solomon’s temple was not built; and Rome arose, conquered the world, and passed into history during the time that this austere chronicle of silent ages has braved the elements.”

It's noteworthy that in the march of human civilization from the Egyptians to the Romans -- which coincides with the rise of monotheism and patriarchal values, the Romans built twice as many obelisks as the Egyptians. During this time, condensed into a period of several hundred years in Greece, three famous philosophers chronicled the decline of women from Socrates, who had no issue and embraced the idea of a woman head of state; to Plato, who said 'perhaps but preferably not' (metaphorically speaking) to AAristotle, who saw women as very inferior to men. Aristotle actually believed that all the DNA, all the human qualities of life were transmitted through semen and the man. The woman was only the 'oven' , the incubator of babies that men actually created.  Read on.

Joshua Woods Snaps Julia Cordova, Marland Backus & Najiyah Imani For Off Black Magazine

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Joshua Woods Snaps Julia Cordova, Marland Backus & Najiyah Imani For Off Black Magazine

Models Julia Cordova, Marland Backus and Najiyah Imani hang in Harlem, styled by Helen Rendell in long, lean looks from pedigreed to street cred. Photographer Joshua Woods captures the New York street scene for Off Black Magazine Autumn Winter 2017./ Makeup by Deanna Melluso; hair by Junya Nakashima

Images by See Management