Jamie Hawkesworth Eyes 'Full Feather' With Binx, Nora + Vittoria For Vogue US May 2019

Binx Walton by Jamie Hawkesworth for Vogue US May 2019

Binx Walton by Jamie Hawkesworth for Vogue US May 2019

Photographer Jamie Hawkesworth flashes Binx Walton, Nora Attal and Vittoria Ceretti in ‘Full Feather’, styled by Camilla Nickerson for Vogue US May 2019./ Hair by James Pecis; makeup by Dick Page

Nora Attal by Jamie Hawkesworth for Vogue US May 2019

Nora Attal by Jamie Hawkesworth for Vogue US May 2019

Fashion has a long history with feathers, with marabou, ostrich, peacock and more practically raining from the clouds. Coco Chanel adored feathers, as did Cristóbal Balenciaga, Christian Dior and Yves Saint Laurent. The late Alexander McQueen was inspired by the feather – “[its] colours, its graphics, its weightlessness and its engineering” – and used it elaborately in his designs, writes The Guardian.

Vittoria Ceretti by Jamie Hawkesworth for Vogue US May 2019

Vittoria Ceretti by Jamie Hawkesworth for Vogue US May 2019

Even if you wouldn’t be caught dead in feathers but sleep on down pillows, this convo is for you. And if your love of animals prompts you to sleep on polyester pillows, we trust that your pillows are made from recycled plastic bottles or even recycled earth-clogging polyester fabric. And what gives your down parka such a lofty look?

These ethical questions become very complicated, and we should hit pause before passing judgment.

Binx Walton by Jamie Hawkesworth for Vogue US May 2019

Binx Walton by Jamie Hawkesworth for Vogue US May 2019

Confirmed: Stella McCartney does not use feathers.

Nora Attal by Jamie Hawkesworth for Vogue US May 2019

Nora Attal by Jamie Hawkesworth for Vogue US May 2019

“Opinion polls show that the overwhelming majority of Brits would never dream of wearing real fur – because most have a clear idea by now of the ways in which animals suffer on fur farms and when caught in steel-jaw traps in the wild,” Yvonne Taylor, the director of corporate projects at Peta, tells The Guardian. “However, many shoppers are still unaware of the cruelty inherent in the down and feather industries.” 

Taylor believes that “all feathers are stolen property”, even if they come from dead chicken breast you’re eating.

Binx Walton by Jamie Hawkesworth for Vogue US May 2019

Binx Walton by Jamie Hawkesworth for Vogue US May 2019

Art curator Karen Van Godtsenhoven, who staged one of the most famous celebrations of feathers, “Birds of Paradise: Plumes & Feathers”, at the fashion museum MoMu in Antwerp in 2014, cites Paris-based Lemaire. She says the 137-year-old atelier, which supplies Chanel to this day, “can make a chicken feather look like it was plucked from a bird of paradise”.

Vittoria Ceretti by Jamie Hawkesworth for Vogue US May 2019

Vittoria Ceretti by Jamie Hawkesworth for Vogue US May 2019

The milliner Stephen Jones, uses barn-fowl feathers (chicken, duck, turkey, goose, grouse, pheasant and ostrich) in his elaborate headpieces “to heighten movement, delicacy or to create dynamic line”. Jones abides by the guidelines on the exploitation of feathers laid down in 1905 by the US non-profit conservation group the Audubon Society. He believes using feathers “is not the same as using exotic skins or fur, because the feathers that are used in millinery are a byproduct of food production.” Jones says he also makes feathers out of tulle, plastics and other materials. But we don’t really want to talk about plastic feathers, do we? beyond which it is “a personal point of view; whether you are carnivore, vegetarian, vegan”.

Fashionista shared a pov on feathers in May 2018, with London’s The Independent picked up the ethical convo around feathers in February 2019.

Binx Walton by Jamie Hawkesworth for Vogue US May 2019

Binx Walton by Jamie Hawkesworth for Vogue US May 2019