Turner Prize Winner Lubaina Himid Explores Black Identities In The Web Of Global Prejudice

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Zanzibar-born Lubaina Himid is the first black woman to ever win the Turner Prize. She’s also the oldest at age 63. Himid's artistic focus is the "forgotten creative legacies of the African diaspora", writes Vogue UK

The politically-charged images that comprise her Turner Prize exhibition drill deeply into prejudice. In 'Swallow Hard: The Lancaster Dinner Service' Lubaina takes the traditional British crockery of history’s elite and, by painting over it, reveals the mostly invisible stories of the servers. By leaving the intricate detailing of the original china around the edges, Himid reveals the complex framework of prejudice that Western society stands on cannot be erased. 

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In a piece with high-impact for AOC readers, 'Negative Positives' demonstrates how the media defines black identity. Using collaged pages from 'The Guardian', Himid exposes that even when black people like Jourdan Dunn receive positive coverage, they are surrounded by negativity. Dunn's image is embedded with race-related headlines like "Second police killing fuels US racial tensions." Ugandan midwives pose in a positive article, but next door on the front page "Gangs are getting younger and more violent, Met chief warns."

Both make for good headlines -- except they are visually and mentally intertwined, argues Lubaina. Unintentionally, just as slaves stood at the dinner table and were complicit in their captivity, today's culturally-celebrated black figures like Dunn participate unintentionally in their own corrupted image. 

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Alex Farquharson, director of Tate Britain and chair of the Turner Prize jury, said he believed Himid’s selection vindicated this year’s decision to lift the restriction on artists over 50 being nominated for the first time since 1991.

He said: “It reflects well on the motivation for lifting it which is an increasing sense that the work of older artists has been making considerable impact on what we’re looking at and how we’re thinking about art today.

“I think there is no longer an overwhelming focus on youth as equating to what’s innovative in contemporary art.”

Nigerian Girls Raped By Boko Haram Are Now Raped By Nigerian Security Forces 'Protecting' Them

Falmata, 14, was abducted and raped repeatedly by Boko Haram fighters. Her trauma then continued in a camp for victims of the war. CreditAdam Ferguson for The New York Times

Falmata, 14, was abducted and raped repeatedly by Boko Haram fighters. Her trauma then continued in a camp for victims of the war. CreditAdam Ferguson for The New York Times

While my self-appointed Grade A feminist friends (note that I have been demoted) obsess with the injustice against the wonderful supporter of women Sen. Al Franken, who resigned yesterday, my own focus today is the dreadful lives of these poor Nigerian girls. (And beating Roy Moore in Alabama) First these innocent young girls were kidnapped from their schools and raped repeatedly for three years by Boko Haram terrorists. Many have babies. And now, having escaped to a Nigerian camp where they are supposed to be safe, these girls are being raped by the men who are supposed to protect them.

Al Franken is a fine, fine, fine man. But I object to him becoming the face of women's rights injustice against men, when women of every age are suffering around the world -- and here in America -- because we do not have body autonomy of ANY KIND. Life is not 'fair' for billions of people around the world. And it's not "fair" at all for these young women.

The ongoing story of these Nigerian girls is so very sad. And I don't know where it will end, and how we can help them grow and flourish when this nightmare is over. If ever. How do they ever believe in humanity again, after all this suffering!!! via The New York Times

Atlanta Mayor's Race Between Bottoms & Norwood Moves To Recount With Bottoms Leading By 800 Votes

Keisha Lance Bottoms at an election night watch party in Atlanta early Wednesday. Ms. Bottoms declared victory after a close mayoral race on Tuesday, but her opponent, Mary Norwood, said she would request a recount. CreditJohn Bazemore/Associated Press

Keisha Lance Bottoms at an election night watch party in Atlanta early Wednesday. Ms. Bottoms declared victory after a close mayoral race on Tuesday, but her opponent, Mary Norwood, said she would request a recount. CreditJohn Bazemore/Associated Press

For the second time in eight years, the leadership Atlanta, the South’s most influential city, is settling into a recount, writes The New York Times. 

Fewer than 800 votes separated Atlanta’s two candidates for mayor, Keisha Lance Bottoms and Mary Norwood, after officials tallied more than 92,000 ballots that were cast in Tuesday's  runoff election. Ms. Norwood, seeking to become Atlanta’s first white mayor in more than 40 years, said she would ask for a recount once provisional and absentee ballots were counted this week.

Ms. Bottoms and her allies would not cede the moment of jubilation, declaring victory on Wednesday.

“This has been a very, very, very long campaign, but as we look ahead toward the future, I look forward to engaging with each of you, making sure that our city continues to move forward,” said Ms. Bottoms, who is a member of the City Council from Southwest Atlanta. “And for those who did not support me, I look forward to working with you as well because this is still a city for all of us.”

This is Ms. Norwood's second recount. In 2009, she sought a recount after trailing Kasim Reed, ultimately losing the race by 714 votes. A single vote changed in the final tally.

In a mayoral race that is formally nonpartisan, Bottoms made her political allegiance plain: She is a Democrat whose beliefs aligned with those of a growing city known as something of a Southern bastion for liberal politics. Norwood ran as an Independent, with Democrats insisting that she is a Republican who quietly embraced Karen Handel in the bitterly contested win against Jon Ossoff. The Times notes that policy differences between the two candidates were minimal.