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Entries in film (11)

Sunday
Jan192014

Film | Wangechi Mutu + Santigold 'The End of Eating Everything' 

AOC introduces the enormously talented Nairobi-born, Brooklyn artist Wangechi Mutu, whose short film ‘The End of Eating Everything’ premiers this week at Sundance. Her stunning collages are on view at the Brooklyn Museum until March 9, 2014. Read more in GlamTribale blog.

“The End of Eating Everything” is an excerpt of artist Wangechi Mutu’s first animated video, created in collaboration with recording artist Santigold and co-released by the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University and MOCAtv on YouTube.

The 8-minute video, “The End of eating Everything,” marks the journey of a flying, planet-like creature navigating a bleak skyscape. This “sick planet” creature is lost in a polluted atmosphere, without grounding or roots, led by hunger towards its own destruction. The animation’s audio, also created by Mutu, fuses industrial and organic sounds.

“The End of Eating Everything” was commissioned by the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University as part of the new exhibition “Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey,” the first survey in the United States for this internationally renowned, multidisciplinary artist, and her most comprehensive and innovative show yet. “The End of eating Everything” can be viewed in person at the Nasher Museum through July 21, 2013, and at the Brooklyn Museum from October 11, 2013-March 9, 2014.

Wangechi Mutu + Santigold Interview about ‘The End of Eating Everything’

Thursday
Nov282013

Requiem By Paul de Luna: Learning To Forgive Oneself

Requiem - A short film by Paul de Luna from Paul de Luna on Vimeo.

Happy Thanksgiving to all our American friends. As usual, your Anne is the madhatter running around saying “I’m late, I’m late … for a very important date.” Actually, I’m never late by the clock, but feeling like the madhatter is for real.

Although we’re technically not late, Feanne and I sure are taking our sweet time posting our joint article on Paul de Luna’s wonderful editorial ‘Samsara’.

In draft form, Feanne opened with “In the beginning, according to a Native American creation myth, there was a woman who fell from the hole in the sky. In fact, she had been ill, and it was an angry man who had kicked her down that hole, sending her plunging into this world.”

My response was “no, no … we want to open with the strong goddesses who then went into battle with male ones. This is the true story of women’s history. With the rise of patriarchal power, indeed women were kicked out of the sky and just about every other place on earth. But in the beginning, write David Leeming and Jake Page:

Curled into a sphere, She lets the mountains rise along Her spine, lets the rising and falling waters seep into Her folds, and here brings forth the swirl of creatures, pulsing sap and blood, the manifold panoply of form, to be and to cease to be under the revolving heavens and the rising, falling, growing, dying, mischievous moon.

She bestows on Her creation the gift of story — stories of motion, aroma, color, texture, sound, word — by which She can be known in her infinite variety and shimmering singularity: the fecund urge, the primal prophetess, the Great Goddess, giver and taker of all. Earth Goddess as life itself.

Pulling the film ‘Samsara’ off Vimeo, I stopped to watch Paul de Luna’s critically-acclaimed film ”Requiem’, a “short film about learning to forgive yourself.”

Mesmerized and touched by ‘Requiem’, I sent it to a dear friend of mine, presently on the high seas off South Africa.  Having reminded us this morning that women suffer from two-thirds of all anxiety disorders, the young woman’s words in ‘Requiem’ should be shared as a modern, immediate life message but also one that dwells on the story of women’s history and man’s decision to dominate nature.

Read Self Love Is The Best Beauty Lotion Of All Time For Glowing Skin & A Happy Smile.

Paul de Luna’s ‘Narcissus’ will appear in all its glory early next week. Until then, Anne Madhatter Enke wishes you all a wonderful holiday season. Be sure to breathe deeply and take time to smell the roses. I promise to follow my own advice. ~ Anne

Sunday
Dec232012

Film | Meghan Collison Stars in Jason Last's 'Scalpel/Stradivarius' with Violinist Sarah Neufeld

The video by Jason Last and Jaime Rubiano starring Arcade Fire violinist, with Meghan Collison won the TheCorner Prize presented at ASVOFF, A Shaded View On Fashion Film, held in October at the Pompidou Centre in Paris.

The video, produced by Vogue.it in two phases, in New York and Paris, carrying out an experimentation that starts from music and culminatesd with fashion: details of couture outfits, fabric used as elements for the set, hair styling as metamorphosis. To go back reflecting on music. And precisely on the notes of Sarah Neufeld, the well-known Canadian violinist and member of band Arcade Fire & The Bell Orchestre who besides playing the music, composed expressly for the film, also appears in the short film playing a graphite violin. Also Canadian is the other female lead in Scalpel/Stradivarius, model Meghan Collison, who has graced the cover of Vogue Italia twice (October 2007 and June 2009).