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'Nasty' Women's News Headlines

The Most Inspiring Moments From the Speeches at the Women's March on Washington Vogue

Hundreds of thousands united at the Women’s March on Washington today, and at sister marches in states and cities across the country and the world. They came in pink pussycat hats and “Keep Abortion Legal” signs (not to mention more than a few posters that read, “I Can’t Believe I’m Still Marching About This Shit”). Among them: celebrity speakers including Gloria Steinem (honorary co-chair of the Women’s March on Washington), America Ferrera, Michael Moore, and Ashley Judd. Here, the most electrifying moments from their speeches.

“The president is not America. His cabinet is not America. Congress is not America. We are America. And we are here to stay . . . We will not go from being a nation of immigrants to a nation of ignorance. We won’t build walls and we won’t see the worst in each other.”— America Ferrera

“Trump and his handlers have found a fox for every chicken coop in Washington. And a Twitter finger must not become a trigger finger . . . . We are the people. We have people power and we will use it . . . The Constitution does not begin with ‘I, the president.’ It begins with ‘We the people.’ . . . When we elect a possible president, we too often go home. We’ve elected an impossible president. We’re never going home.” — Gloria Steinem

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Inside a Bus Full of Women Headed to DC for the Women's March Broadly

We're heading north on I-85 toward Washington, D.C. in a five-bus convoy that departed Greenville, South Carolina at 10:00 PM Friday night. We're on our way to the march.

Our group, which is sponsored by Greenville Democratic Women and the Greenville Democrat Party and includes nearly 300 demonstrators, will be meeting up with a couple hundred thousand others in just a few hours to join the Women's March on Washington.

The individuals around me are strangers, technically. I've never met them, and I'm not a member of either of their organizations; in fact, I don't even reside in the same state. (I flew up from Orlando, Florida a couple days ago to accompany my mom on the trip.) However, friendship blossoms easily on such a journey, and I've already learned much about my companions. They are, of course, mothers, daughters, sisters, wives — but they're also tutors, community organizers, activists, students, writers, photographers, tech professionals. They're as kind as I'd hoped and more solemn than I'd expected.

Where Women's Marches Are Happening Around the World New York Times

Narya Marcille of Narragansett, RI is unable to attend the Women's March in Washington this Saturday January 21. Three family members will be marching for her, and Narya has produced a wonderful piece of art commemorating the Women's March.

Why We March

Maya Angelou and Gloria Steinem, March on Washington (1983)

Maya Angelou and Gloria Steinem, March on Washington (1983)

Writing for Vogue.com Sarah Brown sent a message to her mother days after Trump's election win, daughter Sarah called her second-wave and veteran marcher mother, telling her "Rent a car."

"So much is at stake. I am terrified about our future, concerned for our country and for how we are teaching people, young and old, to treat one another. I’m horrified that, in the immediate wake of the election, students at the New School, blocks from where I live, woke up to swastikas scrawled on their dorm room doors. I’m heartbroken and disgusted that students at elementary schools, high schools, and college campuses suddenly feel they have been given permission to terrorize their black and brown peers, or anyone they perceive to be other, with hateful speech and acts. I can’t imagine a world without Planned Parenthood, a critical women’s health-care organization that is far from a one-stop-abortion-shop, whatever your politics. I’m incensed that the National Endowment for the Arts is on the chopping block! Still, for me, today’s marches are bigger than politics or any single agenda. To quote a Facebook comment from a friend-of-a-friend in Los Angeles: “This is not about Trump, it’s about us.”

Women's March Organizing Committee

Top row (left to right): Ting Ting Cheng, Tabitha St. Bernard, Janaye Ingram, Paola Mendoza, Cassady Fendlay, Linda Sarsour, Bob Bland, Nantasha Williams, Breanne Butler, Ginny Suss, Sarah Sophie Flicker. Bottom row (left to right): Tamika Mallory, Carmen Perez, Vanessa Wruble; Photographed by Cass Bird | Sittings Editor: Jorden Bickham

Top row (left to right): Ting Ting Cheng, Tabitha St. Bernard, Janaye Ingram, Paola Mendoza, Cassady Fendlay, Linda Sarsour, Bob Bland, Nantasha Williams, Breanne Butler, Ginny Suss, Sarah Sophie Flicker. Bottom row (left to right): Tamika Mallory, Carmen Perez, Vanessa Wruble; Photographed by Cass Bird | Sittings Editor: Jorden Bickham

A seasoned group of America's female activists gathered at a South Bronx, New York warehouse turned studio for a group portrait by Cass Bird. Vogue writes that this group of determined women are among the organizers behind "the Women’s March on Washington, a mass mobilization of activists and protestors that will descend on the capital on January 21, the day after we inaugurate into office a man who ran the most brazenly misogynistic presidential campaign in recent history, and whose victory has emboldened a Republican-led Congress to wage an epic war on women’s rights."

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