Tom Ford Becomes Chairman of Council of Fashion Designers of America

Designer Tom Ford will become the new Chairman of the Council of Fashion Designers of America . He succeeds Diane von Furstenberg, who has headed the organization for 13 years.

Designer Tom Ford will become the new Chairman of the Council of Fashion Designers of America . He succeeds Diane von Furstenberg, who has headed the organization for 13 years.

The award-winning fashion designer, film director, screenwriter, and film producer Tom Ford will succeed current Chairwoman Diane von Furstenberg effective June 2019, writes the CFDA.

The Texas-born designer introduced a heady combination of glamour and sensual desire into American fashion.. Ford eagerly embraced smart women with sex appeal believing that women could be both. From the website:

American born Ford began his career as a design assistant for CFDA Member Cathy Hardwick, and joined the CFDA in 2000. He has won a total of seven CFDA Fashion Awards: Menswear Designer of the Year (2015, 2008), Womenswear Designer of the Year (2001), Accessory Designer of the Year (2002), Board of Director’s Tribute (2004), International Designer of the Year (1995), and the Geoffrey Beene Lifetime Achievement Award (2014).

In April 2005, Ford created his eponymous luxury brand, beginning with menswear. Today, the TOM FORD brand offers a complete collection of Menswear, as well as Womenswear, Accessories, Eyewear, Beauty and most recently underwear and timepieces. Ford was previously the Creative Director of Gucci Group, where he designed for luxury houses Gucci and Yves Saint Laurent until 2004.

Current Chairman of the Council of Fashion Designers of America Diane von Furstenberg and incoming Chairman Tom Ford.

Current Chairman of the Council of Fashion Designers of America Diane von Furstenberg and incoming Chairman Tom Ford.

Amal Clooney Launches 2020 Award For Young Women As Ambassador For Prince's Trust International

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Amal Clooney may be a ravishingly beautiful style-setter, but most of her fans are equally inspired by her remarkable intelligence, professional focus on human rights, and willingness to give voice to the underprivileged.

Until now, Amal Clooney’s — and her husband George’s — intimate royal relationship has been with the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, although the couple did attend a Prince’s Trust Internationall dinner in 2016. . Amal wore that spectacular yellow dress to the royal wedding last spring and co-hosted Meghan Markle’s recent baby shower in New York. The Clooneys also returned the Duchess of Sussex to England in a private jet after the shower. It’s also no secret that Prince Charles is very fond of Meghan and is eagerly awaiting the birth of his grandchild, where he intends to be very involved as a proud grandpapa.

It should be no surprise then that Amal Clooney, who made headlines last week attending a Buckingham Palace dinner with her husband, has agreed to assume a formal ambassadorial role with Prince Charles’ youth charity Prince’s Trust International. The human rights lawyer plans to launch her own prize named the Amal Clooney Award, to celebrate inspirational young women. The award is intended to “highlight the work of young women who have succeeded against the odds to make a lasting difference in their communities.”

The first award will be presented by Amal in 2020. Prince’s Trust International is seeking applications from women aged 11 to 30 working in “anything from sustainable farming schemes, to community projects in refugee camps, to rebuild-work in war zones”.

Mrs Clooney said : “I am honoured to have been invited by Prince’s Trust International to participate in this global initiative celebrating young women who are change-makers in their communities. It is a privilege to be able to play a part in a project that will draw attention to incredible young women who are the future leaders of our world”. via The Telegraph UK

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Frida Kahlo Has A New York Moment With New York's Spring Style Issue + Brooklyn Museum Show

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Illustrator Malika Favre’s latest project is the cover art for The New Yorker’s Spring Style Issue, and it’s a beauty. For Frida Kahlo lovers, Favre’s references are unconsciously obvious in ‘Spring to Mind’, her seventh cover for the magazine. Interviewed by Françoise Mouly, Favre explains how her minimalist style exploded into an effusion of color and floral shapes.

The inspiration was Frida Kahlo’s iconic look. I wanted to retain the energy and vibrancy of her paintings and the strength of the woman herself, hence the looser strokes and the explosion of color. This cover may be flamboyant, and it does use organic shapes, but it’s still in tune with my aesthetic approach. My work has a lot to do with colors and shapes, and this piece is another way to experiment with combining those things.

One of Favre’s early sketches for the cover, and her snapshot of a market in Mexico City. Malika Favre

One of Favre’s early sketches for the cover, and her snapshot of a market in Mexico City. Malika Favre

The use of Frida Kahlo inspiration for the New Yorker also relates to a new exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum. The show is not a major exhibition of Kahlo’s paintings with only 11 out of more than 350 objects. Rather ‘Frida Kahlo: Appearances Can Be Deceiving,” is a recapitulation of her life through personal possessions — her clothing, jewelry and favorite objects. The selection of the rich skirts and blouses from the Oaxacan city of Tehuantepec and her statement jewelry that were so key to Kahlo’s substantative style are intrinsically embedded in her art.

Writing for The New York Times, Jason Farago reminds us in Frida Kahlo’s Home Is Still Unlocking Secrets, 50 Years Later: “Hard to imagine she once worked in shadow; when she had her first New York exhibition, in 1938, Vogue preferred to name her “Madame Diego Rivera.”’

“Frida Kahlo, 1939,” Nickolas Muray, © Nickolas Muray Photo Archives

“Frida Kahlo, 1939,” Nickolas Muray, © Nickolas Muray Photo Archives