White Nationalist James Fields Jr, Heather Heyer's Charlottesville Assasin, Sentenced To Life In Prison

James Fields, Jr., the white supremacist who murdered Heather Heyer and injured dozens of others driving his Dodge Challenger into a crowd of peaceful demonstrators in Charlottesville on August 12, 2017 has received a life sentence in federal prison.

Prosecutors had argued that Mr. Fields’s racist, anti-Semitic beliefs motivated his decision to attend the “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville and use his automobile in an act of domestic terrorism. Thomas T. Cullen, the United States attorney for the Western District of Virginia, said after hearing the sentence that the case set a precedent for future instances of domestic terrorism.

Mr. Fields was one of hundreds of young white supremacists who swarmed Charlottesville in August 2017, marching with tiki torches shouting “The Jews will not replace us.”

President Trump’s subsequent assertion that bad actors on “many sides’ were to blame for the violence in Charlottesville was reviled by millions of Americans.

James Fields, Jr. drives his Dodge Challenger into the Charlottesville crowd as it was disbanding, killing Heather Hyer and injuring many who protested against the white nationalists rally.

James Fields, Jr. drives his Dodge Challenger into the Charlottesville crowd as it was disbanding, killing Heather Hyer and injuring many who protested against the white nationalists rally.

'Schindler's List' Rereleased On 25th Anniversary As Anti-Semitism Roars In America

Courtesy of Photofest; Franco Origlia/WireImage 'Schindler’s List' (1993); Inset: Steven Spielberg

Courtesy of Photofest; Franco Origlia/WireImage 'Schindler’s List' (1993); Inset: Steven Spielberg

The epic movie ‘Schindler’s List’ is being released into theaters to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Oscar-winning film that debuted Dec. 15, 1993. ‘Schindler’s List’ — which won seven Oscars, including for best picture, director, adapted screenplay and original score — will be rereleased in a limited engagement on Friday.

Director Steven Spielberg sat down for an interview with ‘NBC Nightly News’ anchor Lester Holt that will air Wednesday, Dec. 12th.

"I think this is maybe the most important time to rerelease this film," said Spielberg, according to a transcript of the interview released ahead of its broadcast. The motion picture about Nazi Germany and the Holocaust may be more important now due to the global rise in hate crimes, hate speech and propaganda — including in America.

"When collective hate organizes and gets industrialized, then genocide follows," the Oscar-winning filmmaker tells 'NBC Nightly News' host Lester Holt in the Dec. 12 interview.

Holt and Spielberg discuss the August 2017 Charlottesville, Virginia murder of 32-year-old Heather Heyer, as she protested a white supremacist rally. President Donald Trump — who has been accused of racism in the past, writes The Hollywood Reporter — inflamed outrage by saying there were "very fine people on both sides" of the tragic Charlottesville event. 

Hate crimes increased by 17 percent last year compared to 2016, according to a new FBI report. Notably, of the 1,679 religious bias crimes reported in 2017, 58.1 percent were anti-Jewish, while 18.6 percent were anti-Muslim.

"I think it's just that — you know, hate has become less of — hate's less parenthetical today, it's more a headline," said Spielberg. 

Charlottesville Car Killer James Alex Fields Jr. Charged With First Degree Murder

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Self-professed neo-Nazi James Alex Fields Jr., 20, has been charged with first-degree murder Thursday, after being jailed on lesser charges since the Aug. 12 for the death of Charlottesville protester Heather D. Heyer

Fields had been charged with second-degree murder, punishable by five to 40 years in prison. WaPo writes:

Authorities had initially said that 19 people were injured, in addition to Heyer, when Fields allegedly rammed his 2010 Dodge Challenger into another vehicle on purpose on a crowded street. But testimony at the preliminary hearing revealed that there were many more victims. Besides first-degree murder, Fields, who lived in Ohio before his arrest, is charged with eight counts of “aggravated malicious wounding,” meaning that at least eight of the 35 people who were hurt suffered what Virginia law describes as “permanent and significant physical impairment," writes the New York Times

The case will be presented to a grand jury next week. If the grand jury issues an indictment of Fields, a trial will follow. First-degree murder requires the element of premeditation. In upgrading the charges against Fields, authorities said video showing the Dodge backing up rapidly before it accelerated forward toward the crowd is concrete evidence that the crash was intentional.