Ralph Lauren Reflects On Family and Philanthropy In Pamela Hanson Images For Town & Country

THE LAUREN FAMILY, FROM LEFT: SON-IN-LAW PAUL ARROUET, COOPER BLUE AND KINGSLEY RAINBOW AND DYLAN LAUREN, RALPH LAUREN, RICKY LAUREN, ANDREW LAUREN, DAVID LAUREN AND JAMES RICHARD AND MAX WALKER WITH DAVID'S WIFE LAUREN BUSH LAUREN.   by Pamela Hanson

THE LAUREN FAMILY, FROM LEFT: SON-IN-LAW PAUL ARROUET, COOPER BLUE AND KINGSLEY RAINBOW AND DYLAN LAUREN, RALPH LAUREN, RICKY LAUREN, ANDREW LAUREN, DAVID LAUREN AND JAMES RICHARD AND MAX WALKER WITH DAVID'S WIFE LAUREN BUSH LAUREN. by Pamela Hanson

Paul Goldberger interviews Ralph Lauren in the ongoing celebration of Lauren’s 50th anniversary of his business. Events began on September 7 with a memorable fashion show and black tie dinner at Bethesda Fountain in Central Park.

On the day of his Goldberger interview, Lauren — a Bronx boy who made good — was practicing throwing out a ceremonial first pitch at Yankee Stadium. Now 78, Ralph Lauren continues as a large presence in the fashion industry. His wife Ricky and three children Andrew, David and Dylan are all part of the big show — one with major substance.

David, 48, is now chief innovation officer and vice chairman of the Ralph Lauren Corporation. At the 50th anniversary fashion show in Central Park, with luminaries like Oprah Winfrey and Hillary Clinton headlining the event, all the Laurens stood up when dad took his bows, as they do at every one of his shows.

Lauren explains: “I am very emotional about life and family—I’ve been married for 54 years. I’ve appreciated my life and my family, and I’ve been very lucky. So as far as philanthropy is concerned, I have never done anything for effect, only if I have been interested in it. I had a brain tumor 30 years ago, and after that I saw my friend Nina Hyde of the Washington Post, who had breast cancer. She wanted to start a center for women with cancer, and I said I would help her.

Then I thought we could do more, and I went to Memorial Sloan-Kettering, and a very dedicated doctor said they really needed help in Harlem, and we built a cancer center there. I’m not a doctor; I just wanted to do what I could to help. And I don’t think I’m finished. We have done other things, too. We supported the restoration of the American flag [the original Star-Spangled Banner that flew over Fort McHenry during the War of 1812], because America has been very good to me. “

With a new CEO Patrice Louvet at the helm, Lauren remains chairman and chief creative officer. Read on in a very meaty interview: The Laurens: Three Generations of a Style Dynasty.

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Doutzen Kroes Says Ambassador Role For #Knot On My Planet Gives Her Sense Of Purpose

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Supermodel Doutzen Kroes didn’t just become an activist two years ago, but the Dutch superstar model, mom, wife, design collaborator and activist for humanity tells Vanity Fair that it’s her role as global ambassador for #Knot on My Planet that gives her a tremendous sense of purpose.

Vanity Fair checked in with Kroes before shooting the new #Knot on My Planet campaign with Naomi Campbell and Serena Williams also part of the production. The Knot on My Planet elephant conservation effort gained momentum when Reed Krakoff became chief artistic officer of Tiffany & Co. last year. The new collection will expand beyond elephants to also include rhino and lion pieces.

Tiffany has partnered with the Elephant Crisis Fund on the #KnotOnMyPlanet campaign, launching an initial campaign featuring Linda Evangelista, Christy Turlington Burns, Naomi Campbell and other prominent voices tying a knot to never forget elephants under threat from ivory poachers.

While there has been some good news — China banned all commercial ivory trading in 2017 — the situation remains bleak in many African countries. Most recently, nearly 100 elephants were discovered dead in Botswana, a country that has relaxed its elephant protection policies under its newly-elected president Mokgweetsi Masisi. New reports in Africa are that Botswana is also considering lifting its hunting ban.

Followup October. 21, 2018: The New York Times wrote on September 28 an article ‘Doubts Mount in Botswana Over Charity’s Claim of Elephant ‘Poaching Frenzy’.

We will dig much deeper into the very thoughtful arguments raised in this article concerning the influences of outside groups involved in elephant conservation being pitted against the wishes and interests of native Africans living on the land. The NYT article is too complex and valuable a read to treat it as an addendum.

African elephants photographed by Susan McConnell.

African elephants photographed by Susan McConnell.

Returning to Tiffany & Co, Anisa Kamadoli Costa, chief sustainability officer at Tiffany and chairman and president of The Tiffany & Co. Foundation, sat down with Dr. Iain Douglas-Hamilton, founder of Save the Elephants, to discuss his tireless efforts on behalf of these magnificent creatures and what we can all do to help.

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Carine Roitfeld Breaks Ranks With Gigi & Halima Promoting UNICEF USA & Doing Good In CR Fashionbook #23

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Models Gigi Hadid and Halima Aden cover CR Fashion Book Issue 13, an issue dedicated to UNICEF USA, according to editor Carine Roitfeld.  Carine broke away from the fashion pack with her fall issue, dedicated to doing good by raising awareness for the global children's relief organization with two of its newest ambassadors Hadid, the half Palestinian daughter of a Syrian refugee and Aden, a Somali refugee and prominent Muslim, hijab-wearing model. 

“The state of fashion media is absolutely in flux so it was really important for me to use my existing platform for good,” Roitfeld told The Hollywood Reporter. Choosing to spotlight UNICEF USA was a response to the international news. According to the organization, “more children are on the move now than at any point since World War II,” notes Roitfeld, the editor of Vogue Paris for a decade before founding CR Fashion Book in 2012.

Reflecting on the state of magazines generally, Carine Roitfeld says: "It’s difficult for me to talk about the future because things are constantly changing. Over 15 years ago I was asked this question while everyone was going digital and no one knew what was going to happen. Print survived then and it’s still trying to survive now," she says. "Today we are up against social media, which is a blessing and curse. People have much more access in real time — they don’t want to wait until an issue hits stands to read something. I think maybe some magazines will stay but they have to be very beautiful, like a collector’s item. They have to feature people and topics that are unique, that stand out but also resonate globally.”

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Gigi Hadid was in the Jamtoli Refugee Camp in Bangladesh days ago, telling the UNICEF story to her over 40 million Instagram followers. And Halima achieved her dream she discussed with Carine in December 2017 of becoming a UN Ambassador. Aden recently returned to her refugee camp in Kenya to launch a TEDX talk. 

Related:

Gigi Hadid and Halima Aden Model Archives @ AOC