Kamala Harris Eyes Big Win In March 3, 2020 California Counts Now Primary With Early Voting Timed With Iowa + New Hampshire

While the Democratic presidential field is still taking shape, the lack of an in-state competitor plays to Sen. Kamala Harris’ advantage. | Denis Poroy/AP Photo

While the Democratic presidential field is still taking shape, the lack of an in-state competitor plays to Sen. Kamala Harris’ advantage. | Denis Poroy/AP Photo

As America readies another presidential election season and trained journalists are talking Iowa and New Hampshire — two states that do not at all mirror the voter makeup of America or the wins of the 2018 mid-terms — Sen. Kamala Harris is beating down door in California. Not content with a wait and see strategy, Senator Harris is locking down endorsements and financial contributions in her new Super Tuesday March 3 primary state — and her home state — that could give her an enormous edge in winning the Democratic nomination. The decision of California to move up its primary from being last in the country makes it suddenly very relevant.

If she has anything but stellar success in California, writes Politico, her presidential aspirations for 2020 could end quickly. Kamala Harris has a true political machine in California and no home-state challengers. Not that Harris isn’t busy making appearances out of California.

In particular, she’s courting voters in another Super Tuesday state — South Carolina. If Biden runs, he does have close relationships with African American voters in the South Carolina, but it’s pretty inconceivable that African American women won’t break big for Sen. Harris in South Carolina.

Harris is getting high praise for her social media efforts and the infrastructure she’s built in California. And she knows the new reality that other candidates are only beginning to understand. Iowa and New Hampshire voters are accustomed to having almost undivided attention from primary candidates. But early voting in California starts in February — timed with Iowa’s caucus and New Hampshire’s primary.

If Bernie Sanders gets in the race as expected, facts are that three of the top seven regions that generated his donations are in California: Los Angeles-Long Beach, San Francisco and Oakland. But many financial bundlers are saying that donors are expressing “more interest in younger, next-generation candidates than those from the older political guard.”

And, of course, there is the unleashing of energy and big wins among female candidates in the 2018 midterms. Both Bernie and Biden may find that the old boys landscape has changed. At rock bottom, of course, all Democrats are committed to beating Trump as a MUST DO. While legions of Dems want a female president, job #1 is sending the Trump family packing. Read on at Politico.

'Knock Down the House' Documentary Featuring AOC + Three 2018 Democratic Candidates Sold To Netflix for $10 Million

Sundance Knock Down the House.jpg

The Kickstarter campaign read: When her daughter died from a preventable medical condition, businesswoman Amy Vilela of Las Vegas didn't know what to do with her anger about America's broken health care system. Bronx-born Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez had to work double shifts in a restaurant to save her family’s home from foreclosure after losing her father. Cori Bush, a Saint Louis nurse, was drawn into the streets when the shooting of Michael Brown brought protests and tanks into her neighborhood. Paula Jean Swearengin buried family and neighbors to illnesses caused by West Virginia’s coal industry — and worries her children will be next. All four women understood that their lives were affected by politics, but none had considered running for office themselves. Until now.

424 backers pledged $28,111 to help bring the documentary ‘Knock Down The House: A Documentary’ to life. Created by Rachel Lears and Robin Blotnick, ‘Knock Down The House’ won the Sundance’s Festival Favorite Award, a fact that most certainly impacted the recent sale of all distribution rights to the film to Netflix for $10 million. Deadline reports that NEON, Focus, Hulu and Amazon were also vying for the feature

(Left to right) Paula Jean Swearengin, Amy Vilella, film director Rachel Lears, and Cori Bush at the Sundance premiere of  Knock Down the House  (photo courtesy Sundance Institute). Missing is Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio Cortez, who scored one of the greatest upsets in political history in her defeat of Joe Crowley..

(Left to right) Paula Jean Swearengin, Amy Vilella, film director Rachel Lears, and Cori Bush at the Sundance premiere of Knock Down the House (photo courtesy Sundance Institute). Missing is Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio Cortez, who scored one of the greatest upsets in political history in her defeat of Joe Crowley..

Hyperallergic profiles the film, writing that Lears has a good eye and sharp instincts in her decision to shadow Ocasio Cortez’s campaign even before she filed her nomination.

On one hand, through Ocasio Cortez’s campaign, Lears’ pragmatic lens reveals the very foundation on which America was built: a land that epitomized countless possibilities and equal opportunities for just about anyone. And on the other, she mines Ocasio Cortez’s solitary – and toilsome – win to anchor the frustrations of the “process” that fails the other three candidates.

The film has many bittersweet moments that deal with rejections, and it refuses to use AOC’s win to suggest that the door is wide open for women candidates. On a call, Ocasio Cortez consoles Villela after her loss with a “It’s just the reality that for one of us to make it, a thousand of us have to try.” It’s the same wisdom she passes on to her niece while handing out flyers, “For every 10 rejections, you get one acceptance, and that’s how you win everything” and by extension, the awareness that the film wishes to pass down to its audience.

The system is designed to hold outsiders at bay, concludes Hyperallergic. Being jazzed by AOC’s win is fantabulous. But without huge, systemic changes in the American system, it’s tough to see how real change happens. Still, #SHE PERSISTED!

Mn. Rep Ilhan Omar Rebuked Over Anti-Semitic Tweet, Faces Loss Of Seat On Foreign Relations Committee

Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.) with fellow lawmakers ahead of President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address, at the Capitol in Washington, Feb. 5, 2019.  Image: Minneapolis Star Tribune  via Erin Schaff New York Times

Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.) with fellow lawmakers ahead of President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address, at the Capitol in Washington, Feb. 5, 2019. Image: Minneapolis Star Tribune via Erin Schaff New York Times

In a dramatic statement delivered on Monday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other Democratic leaders are calling on Minn. Rep Ilhan Omar to apologize for tweeting the strong suggestion that political donations drive politiciams’ support for Israel.

In the dramatic statement, House Democratic leadership said that while "legitimate criticism of Israel's policies is protected by the values of free speech and democratic debate," Omar's "use of anti-Semitic tropes and prejudicial accusations about Israel's top supporters is deeply offensive."

"We condemn these remarks and we call upon congresswoman Omar to immediately apologize for these hurtful comments," read the statement, tweeted out by Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

Omar is facing fresh criticism and scrutiny, including from some of the most powerful members of her own party, after using language in a tweet condemned as a "vile anti-Semitic trope."

The Democratic congresswoman shared a tweet Sunday on House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy pledging to take "action" in response to her support of movements to boycott and sanction Israel over its treatment of Palestinians. "It's all about the Benjamins baby," she wrote, adding a musical note emoji.

The line comes from a 1997 Puff Daddy song and drew immediate criticism from local Minnesota and national leaders, with some issuing calls to remove her from her position on the Foreign Affairs Committee.

Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Eliot Engel said it is "shocking to hear a member of Congress invoke the anti-Semitic trope of 'Jewish money.'"  Engel, who is a Jewish New York Democrat, did not address calls to have Omar removed from his committee.

Locally, the Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas condemned the tweet, saying the language "should have no place in politics."

"Such rhetoric puts our community in danger," read the statement, which added that it's insulting "to falsely suggest that elected officials only support Israel because they are paid to do so."

In a follow-up tweet, the freshman congresswoman said she was referencing the American-Israel Public Affairs Committee, a powerful pro-Israel lobbying organization.  While all acknowledge that pro-Israel lobbying supports candidates in both parties, AIPAC is a nonprofit forbidden from making political candidate contributions.

"We should expect all elected officials, regardless of party, and all public figures to not traffic in anti-Semitism," Chelsea Clinton, whose husband is Jewish, tweeted.

Fellow freshman Democratic Rep. Max Rose of New York called the comments "deeply hurtful to Jews, including myself," according to Politico. Two other Democratic representatives wrote a letter to congressional leaders saying they are "deeply alarmed by the language," according to the Washington Post. "We urge you to join us in calling on each member of our Caucus to unite against anti-Semitism and hateful tropes and stereotypes," they wrote.

GOP groups, including the National Republican Congressional Committee, blasted Omar over the remarks. Minnesota Republican Party Chairwoman Jennifer Carnahan called on Minnesota Democrats, including Sen. Amy Klobuchar, to denounce the remarks and said House leadership should strip the freshman congresswoman of her committee assignments. Sen. Klobuchar’s office has not responded.

"It's clear that congresswoman Ilhan Omar harbors deep-seated anti-Semitic views," Carnahan said in a statement. "There's no place for this in Congress or among our Minnesota congressional delegation."

The Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas echoed those calls for rebuke.

"We completely agree with Ambassador Dan Shapiro that Rep. Omar's 'outrageous comments equating politicians' support for Israel with being bought off by American Jewish money are a vile anti-Semitic trope," the group said. "They need to be condemned by all in our party."

The Minneapolis Tribune writes that Omar previously came under fire for her 2012 tweet saying "Israel has hypnotized the world" was also widely rebuked for using anti-Semitic stereotypes. Omar has since said that tweet, sent in response to reports of military action against Hamas, used "unfortunate words." Last month, she also faced criticism for suggesting, without evidence, that U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., remained a staunch ally to the president because he was somehow "compromised."

Jonathan A. Greenblatt, CEO and national director of the Anti-Defamation Leauge, cited that record in joining calls for House leadership to respond, saying the latest tweets are "part of a disturbing pattern of behavior that must end."

"Unfortunately, making insensitive statements toward the Jewish community is not new for Rep. Omar ... The congresswoman needs to understand that these comments promote dangerous stereotypes and are hurtful to her Jewish constituents and Jewish-Americans throughout the country," Greenblatt's statement read.

A spokesman for Omar did not immediately respond to the Star Tribune's request for comment on the latest backlash. Her office told Politico that the tweets "speak for themselves."