Anna Wintour: Fashion Must Take A Strong Stand For Democratic Party Values + Female Leadership

Anna Wintour attends the 72nd annual Tony Awards in New York City in June 2018  Image by Walter McBride  via CNN

Anna Wintour attends the 72nd annual Tony Awards in New York City in June 2018 Image by Walter McBride via CNN

CNN's Chief International Anchor Christiane Amanpour interviewed Vogue’s Anna Wintour in New York on Friday April 5, 2019.

Wintour’s 2019 Met Gala is scheduled for May 6, with the theme ‘Camp Notes on Fashion’ , a topic at the heart of Gucci’s brand revival under creative director Alessandro Michele. Curated by Andrew Bolton, the exhibit opens to the public on May 9.

"I like to say that we go from sun kings to drag queens in the show; it's to be hoped that there will be plenty of both, not only at the gala but also coming to see the exhibition," Wintour says about the exhibit.

The organizing committee for the event includes the top names in fashion and especially acting, with Bradley Cooper, Blake Lively and Ryan Reynolds, Chadwick Boseman, Lupita Nyong’o and Jennifer Lopez with fiance Alex Rodriguez on the list. For a complete rundown, read The Hollywood Reporter.

Last year’s theme focused on the Vatican’s influence on fashion, giving Lena Waithe the opportunity to make a major fashion statement in the time of Trump. Wintour talks politics and values with Amanpour.

Lena Waithe at the 2018 Met Gala wearing a rainbow pride flag cape designed by Carolina Herrera. (Getty Images  via The Evening Standard.)

Lena Waithe at the 2018 Met Gala wearing a rainbow pride flag cape designed by Carolina Herrera. (Getty Images via The Evening Standard.)

Amanpour writes that Wintour referenced multiple times during the interview the need of “taking a stand”. Both her support of Hillary Clinton and agony over the election of Donald Trump to the US presidency are well documented. Wintour put Michelle Obama on Vogue's cover three times, and the magazine has recently profiled Senator Kamala Harris and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

Asked about Vogue's forays into politics, Wintour said: "I don't think it's a moment not to take a stand ... I believe, as I think those of us who work at Condé Nast believe, that you have to stand up for what you believe in and you have to take a point of view."

Asked about the majority of Vogue political figures being Democrats, the editor-in-chief responded: "I think it's very, very important to have a point of view, and we profile women in the magazine that we believe in ... After the defeat of Secretary Clinton in 2016 (in particular), we believe that women should have a leadership position and we intend to support them."

New Zealand's prime minister Jacinda Ardern, who received a staggering amount of praise for her response to the terror attacks on two mosques in Christchurch, is another female politician with major support from Vogue and Wintour herself. "I think that she's an exceptionally direct, articulate person," Wintour said of Ardern. "And there is no sense that she's ever on message.

"She truly brought the country together in such a remarkable way that I haven't seen many other leaders achieve. And she was just so moving, and when she said, 'we are all one country,' it was a message that a lot of other leaders could learn from."

Anna Wintour will celebrate her 70th birthday this year, and Condé Nast insists she’s not going anywhere. Amanpour’s interview happened the day after Condé Nast appointed Roger Lynch, former CEO of the music streaming service Pandora, as its first global chief executive.

"Anna Wintour is an incredibly talented and creative leader whose influence is beyond measure," Sauerberg's statement read. "She is integral to the future of our company's transformation and has agreed to work with me indefinitely in her role as editor-in-chief, Vogue and artistic director of Condé Nast."

WWD quotes insiders as saying that British Vogue editor in chief Edward Enninful, most frequently brought up as Wintour’s future replacement, is not headed Stateside.

"Edward is a brilliant editor," Wintour tells Amanpour. "And I think he's really, in his fearless style of editing, brought a completely different point of view to British Vogue -- with no disrespect to the editor that was there for many years before Edward.

"I think that he's very passionate about race. He's very passionate about politics ... He is taking a stand and he is not trying to please everybody, because you can't in this day and age."

Women Kick Open Door On Superheros Boys Club With Captain Marvel's Billion $$$

“We live in a capitalist culture. What makes money is valued. I want this to make a lot of money, because it will change the way that people think about women.”

The morning after ‘Captain Marvel’ premiered in LA—but before the Brie Larson blockbuster hit the global bigscreen —Carol Danvers’ creator, comic-book writer Kelly Sue DeConnick sat down with Vanity Fair.

‘Captain Marvel’ has delivered the benjamins, officially becoming the first female-led superhero film to join the billion-dollar box-office boys’ club.

For years a team of women have labored to create Carol Danvers, and ‘Captain Marvel’ is liftoff. These talents want to make sure ‘Captain Marvel’ is only the beginning when it comes to women busting open doors in the traditionally no femmes allowed world of action and genre stories.

In 2014, Marvel approached writer Nicole Perlman (Guardians of the Galaxy, Detective Pikachu), who went to work on cracking Carol’s story with Meg LeFauve(Inside Out) throughout 2015 and 2016. Geneva Robertson-Dworet joined the project in June 2017, and worked for six months to put the puzzle pieces together, along with Captain Marvel co-directors Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck. DeConnick herself was brought in to consult during the last year of the project.

Captain Marvel  screenwriters Nicole Perlman and Geneva Robertson-Dworet;  Captain Marvel  comic writer Kelly Sue DeConnick.

Captain Marvel screenwriters Nicole Perlman and Geneva Robertson-Dworet; Captain Marvel comic writer Kelly Sue DeConnick.

In this new era where women are increasingly candid about the workplace, Robertson-Dworet and Perlman have joined forces with Lindsey Beer (The Kingkiller Chronicle) in new production company called Known Universe Perlman tells Vanity Fair’s Joanna Robinson, that the entire Captain Marvel team rowed in the same boat, with credits deserved all the way around. Known Universe will combine clout the women have combining the clout the women earned on past projects to “exponentially lift up storytellers and less heard voices.”

“Women are refusing to fall into the trap of being set against one another as though there’s only one seat at the table,” DeConnick said, “and we’re all competing for it. There’s an incredible Ruth Bader Ginsburg quote where she was asked how many women on the Supreme Court would be enough. She’s like: ‘I don’t know, maybe nine?’ It’s just the tiniest shift in perspective. What if we didn’t ask permission?”

“We didn’t want her to just be Sylvester Stallone, but with breasts. We wanted her to be a strong woman.”

The ‘Captain Marvel’ team made it a priority to create a character whose strength was embedded in the female experience. “We didn’t want her to just be Sylvester Stallone, but with breasts. We wanted her to be a strong woman, which, of course, led to wonderful conversations with Meg about what that means. We wanted to make sure that our version of what it meant to be powerful wasn’t just a hard, unyielding, never-emotional person,” Perlman said. “Meg and I don’t believe that that is what it means to be strong.”

Now Hollywood is scrambling to put more female-led action projects in the pipeline. Sony has several Spider-Women and villainess projectsin the works. ‘Wonder Woman’ director Patty Jenkins reportedly more than tripled her salary when she was tapped to direct that film’s sequel. Star-turned-producer Margot Robbie  has put Cathy Yan at the helm the upcoming ‘Suicide Squad’ spin-off ‘Birds of Prey’, centered on the villainous Harley Quinn. Robbie’s refusal to compromise on her desire for a woman director makes Yan the first Asian woman to direct a DC superhero film.

AOC writes regularly about Hollywood women with upcoming pictures, and the narrative is always the same: Time’s Up.

Malala Yousafzai + Father Ziauddin Sign With UTA Agency Culture + Leadership Head Darnell Strom

Nobel winner, Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai has signed with United Talent Agency. Courtesy of UTA

Nobel winner, Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai has signed with United Talent Agency. Courtesy of UTA

21 years-old Pakistani activist and Oxford University student Malala Yousafzai and her father Ziauddin have signed with United Talent Agency’s new Culture and Leadership division. which reunites them with their former CAA (Creative Artists Agency) agent turned UTA division head Darnell Strom.

UTA head of Culture and Leadership division Darnell Strom.

UTA head of Culture and Leadership division Darnell Strom.

Strom left his agent position at CAA in January to head the new division at UTA. Strom himself is an experienced speaker and moderator, taking the stage at the Aspen Ideas Festival, Sundance, Clinton Global Initiative, Brilliant Minds, Web Summit and the United Nations' Nexus Global Youth Summit. 

The world came to know Malala Yousafzai in 2012 when the Nobel Peace Prize winner was shot in the head by a Taliban assassin, who boarded her school bus in Pakistan’s Swat Valley.

Malala survived and was airlifted to the United Kingdom, where she recovered in Birmingham, and continued her activist work with a strong emphasis on girls education. Together with her schoolteacher father, Ziauddin who was an equally strong proponent of girls education, perhaps the world’s most famous father-daughter activists team founded the Malala Fund. In 2014, at age 17, the astoundingly committed and articulate Malala became the youngest person to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. Now 21, she is studying philosophy, politics and economics at Oxford.

Malala Yousafzai and her father Ziauddin Yousafzai  via National Geographic Australia

Malala Yousafzai and her father Ziauddin Yousafzai via National Geographic Australia

"When I started my fight for girls at 11 years old, working with media and public speaking were key to building support for my efforts," said Malala, the subject of Davis Guggenheim's 2015 documentary ‘He Named Me Malala’ and author of ‘ I Am Malala’, ‘Malala's Magic Pencil’ and ‘We Are Displaced’. "I look forward to working with UTA to develop creative ways to amplify the voices of the next generation of girls and young women."

"To achieve gender equality, we need support from women and men, leaders in every sector. Darnell understands this, and I am excited to continue working with him at UTA," said Ziauddin Yousafzai, who serves alongside his daughter on the Malala Fund board. He wrote his autobiography, ‘Let Her Fly’, last year.

The father and daughter team were interviewed by National Geographic Australia in 2016, where the question was posed to Mr. Yousafzai: “What’s it like to be known as Malala’s dad?” Note dad’s use of the word ‘patriarchy’ in his response!

I think it happened to me in Swat before Malala was attacked. My friends in Swat, when they used to invite me to the podium, they used to say, “Now we invite Malala’s father.” So it was really something very inspiring. In a patriarchal society, men and women both, they are always known by their family, and I think I am one of those few—hardly any—who is known by his daughter. I’m very proud of it, and I’m thankful to God. I’m a blessed father to be known by my daughter. 

On Thursday and Friday of this week, she spoke at The Art of Leadership for Women Conferences in Calgary and then Vancouver, Canada.

Malala isn’t current listed on the 10th annual Women in the World Summit in New York April 10-12, 2019.

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