Prince Harry, Nat Geo, Steve Boyes Take Us 'Into The Okavango' A Fragile Ecosystem We Simply MUST Save

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Prince Harry, Nat Geo, Steve Boyes Take Us 'Into The Okavango' A Fragile Ecosystem We Simply MUST Save

Prince Harry, the Duke of Sussex, discussed his ‘20 year connection’ with Angola and Botswana, posting a heartfelt Instagram message on Thursday. The tribute was created in conjunction with a fundraising event promoting National Geographic’s ‘Into The Okavango’ documentary film.

Harry explained that he is ‘grateful’ to see National Geographic partnering with both the Angolan government and The Halo Trust to promote the sustainable management of the Okavango Delta’s resources.

Mozambique's Niassa Reserve Celebrates One Year Of No Elephant Kills | The Women Of Gorongosa Park

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Mozambique's Niassa Reserve Celebrates One Year Of No Elephant Kills | The Women Of Gorongosa Park

Beautiful Girls Meet Animals in Central Mozambique’s Gorongosa Park,

Researching the Niassa Reserve story, AOC found this exquisite video from Mozambique’s Gorongosa Park that’s a total respite — a small escape — from the world’s tragic events on The Guardian website.

Before you watch it, consider that in March 2019, Cyclone Idai devastated the communities around Mozambique's Gorongosa Park. There was no escape, no respite for the people of Mozambique as we steal precious moments with this video.

National Geographic reminded us just now of the cyclone, with the coincidence of a feature story on Grongosa National Park in the May 2019 issue of National Geographic. Click here to learn how you can help on the National Geographic website. Also, Gorongosa itself has information about devastation from the cyclone and how to help.

Landmines in Angola: How African Elephants’ Amazing Sense of Smell Could Save Lives

CHISHURU, A MALE AFRICAN ELEPHANT, INDICATES A TARGET SCENT DURING TRIALS. IMAGE BY GRAHAM ALEXANDER.

CHISHURU, A MALE AFRICAN ELEPHANT, INDICATES A TARGET SCENT DURING TRIALS. IMAGE BY GRAHAM ALEXANDER.

Landmines in Angola: How African Elephants’ Amazing Sense of Smell Could Save Lives

By Ashadee Kay Miller, PhD Candidate, School of Animal, Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand. First published on The Conversation.

For 27 years Angola was gripped by civil war. Half a million human lives were lost and wildlife, too, was decimated to sustain troops. Rhino and elephants became valuable targets – rhino horn and ivory served as currency for arms among rebel forces.

During the conflict elephant populations fled across the border into Botswana, Zambia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. When the war ended in 2002 animal populations slowly started to return to their pre-conflict grazing grounds. But a huge problem remained: millions of landmines were still in situ and undetonated across Angola. Many elephants were killed and maimed by the explosives as they attempted to recolonise.

Data collected from collared elephants moving through the affected areas showed herds avoiding minefields. This suggested that at least some of the returning elephants had associated minefields with danger. What could this association be based on? Had the minefield-avoiding elephants seen others killed in those areas? Or had they associated the smell of landmines with danger, extrapolating risk to other areas where the odour was present?

We couldn’t answer all these questions. To narrow down our search my colleagues and I set about finding out whether elephants could smell the main component of landmines – Trinitrotoluene (TNT).

LVMH Acquires Botswana Luxury Safari Camps, Joins High-Level UNESCO Conservation Effort

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LVMH Acquires Botswana Luxury Safari Camps, Joins High-Level UNESCO Conservation Effort

British actress, poet and filmmaker Greta Bellamacina boards the Orient Express, headed for Venice in a fashion journey that’s pure ‘Poetry in Motion’. Photographer Tom Craig is behind the lens with styling by Leith Clark for Harper’s Bazaar UK July 2019./ Hair by Sebastien Bascle

Tom Craig Captures 'Poetry in Motion' As LVMH Stakes Strong Claim In Luxury Hospitality

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Tom Craig Captures 'Poetry in Motion' As LVMH Stakes Strong Claim In Luxury Hospitality

British actress, poet and filmmaker Greta Bellamacina boards the Orient Express, headed for Venice in a fashion journey that’s pure ‘Poetry in Motion’. Photographer Tom Craig is behind the lens with styling by Leith Clark for Harper’s Bazaar UK July 2019./ Hair by Sebastien Bascle

Queen Elizabeth Plans Meghan's B-Day Party At Balmoreal As Royals Eye Fall 2019 Africa Trip

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Queen Elizabeth Plans Meghan's B-Day Party At Balmoreal As Royals Eye Fall 2019 Africa Trip

Today June 17th, Prince Harry is working with HALO representatives, representatives of the Angolan government, conservation experts and philanthropists worldwide to discuss how clearing landmines from the unique Okavango headwaters in Angola is step one in protecting this precious habitat.

Twice as large as the UK, the Kavango-Zambezi Trans-Frontier Conservation Area (KAZA) is Africa’s great wild space where Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe converge. At its heart is the World Heritage Site of the Okavango Delta, fed by headwaters rising in the far southeast of Angola. The success of the KAZA is of crucial importance to the development of southern Africa.