Bees Can Learn The Difference Between European And Australian Indigenous Art Styles In A Single Afternoon

A COMMUNITY ARTS PROJECT INITIATED BY JULIE ARMSTRONG TO RAISE AWARENESS OF THE IMPORTANCE OF BEES FOR POLLINATION FOR A WHOPPING 2/3 OF OUR FOOD PRODUCTION.  ACT FOR BEES

A COMMUNITY ARTS PROJECT INITIATED BY JULIE ARMSTRONG TO RAISE AWARENESS OF THE IMPORTANCE OF BEES FOR POLLINATION FOR A WHOPPING 2/3 OF OUR FOOD PRODUCTION. ACT FOR BEES

Bees Can Learn The Difference Between European And Australian Indigenous Art Styles In A Single Afternoon

By Andrew Barron, Associate Professor, Macquarie University. . First published on The Convervsation

We’ve known for a while that honey bees are smart cookies. They have excellent navigation skills, they communicate symbolically through dance, and they’re the only insects that have been shown to learn abstract concepts.

Honey bees might also add the title of art connoisseur to their box of tricks. In part one of ABC Catalyst’s The Great Australian Bee Challenge, we see honey bees learning to tell the difference between European and Australian Indigenous art in just one afternoon.

Does this mean honey bees are more cultured than we are?

Perhaps not, but the experiment certainly shows just how quickly honey bees can learn to process very complex information.

How the experiment worked

Bees were shown four different paintings by the French impressionist artist Claude Monet, and four paintings by Australian Indigenous artist Noŋgirrŋa Marawili.

At the centre of each of the paintings was placed a small blue dot. To make the difference between the artists meaningful to the honey bees, every time they landed on the blue dot on a Marawili painting they found a minute drop of sugar water. Every time they visited the blue dot on a Monet painting, however, they found a drop of dilute quinine. The quinine isn’t harmful, but it does taste bitter.

Having experienced each of the Monet and Marawili paintings the bees were given a test. They were shown paintings by the two artists that they had never seen before. Could they tell the difference between a Marawili and a Monet?

All the trained bees clearly directed their attention to the Marawili paintings.

This experiment was a recreation of a study first conducted by Dr Judith Reinhard’s team at the University of Queensland. In the original study, Reinhard was able to train bees to tell the difference between paintings by Monet and Picasso.

Bees are quick to learn

Coffee: 60% of Wild Species Are At Risk of Extinction Due to Climate Change

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Coffee: 60% of Wild Species Are At Risk of Extinction Due to Climate Change

Dark days ahead for coffee

Climate change is threatening global coffee yields as changing temperatures and rainfall patterns affect plant growth. The changing climate may also be leaving plants more vulnerable to disease.

All major commercial coffee growing countries have been badly affected by the fungal disease “coffee leaf rust”, which spread across Africa and into Asia during the early 20th century, then to South America, becoming entrenched globally by the turn of the millennium.

The Central American coffee rust outbreak that began in the 2011-2012 harvest season affected 70% of farms in the region, resulting in over 1.7m lost jobs and US$3.2 billion in damage and lost income.

Robusta varieties used for the instant blends have been key to developing resistance to coffee leaf rust in Arabica varieties through cross breeding. As climate change and disease risks escalate, wild coffee species offer a crucial resource for maintaining the world’s coffee supply. Arabica has tightly limited geographic ranges in which it grows well and Robusta, while resistant to leaf rust, is vulnerable to other diseases.

Scientists Call for Drastic Drop in Emissions. U.S. Appears to Have Gone the Other Way.

Photo by  Jaromír Kavan  on  Unsplash

Scientists Call for Drastic Drop in Emissions. U.S. Appears to Have Gone the Other Way.

By Abraham Lustgarten , ProPublica. This story was originally published by ProPublica.

The signals are blaring: Dramatic changes to our climate are well upon us. These changes — we know thanks to a steady drumbeat of alarming official reports over the past 12 months — could cripple the U.S. economy, threaten to make vast stretches of our coastlines uninhabitable, make basic food supplies scarce and push millions of the planet’s poorest people into cities and across borders as they flee environmental perils.

All is not yet lost, we are told, but the demands of the moment are great. The resounding consensus of scientists, economists and analysts tells us that the solution lies in an unprecedented global effort to immediately and drastically drop carbon emissions levels. That drop is possible, but it will need to happen so fast that it will demand extraordinary commitment, resolve, innovation and, yes, sacrifice. The time we’ve got to work with, according to the United Nations, is a tad more than 10 years.

And so it stings particularly badly to learn from a new report released this weekby the Rhodium Group, a private research company, that U.S. emissions — which amount to one-sixth of the planet’s — didn’t drop in 2018 but instead skyrocketed. The 3.4 percent jump in CO2 for 2018, projected by the Rhodium Group, would be second-largest surge in greenhouse gas emissions from the United States since 1996, when Bill Clinton was president.

Behati Prinsloo Steps Up For Rhinos in Namibia, Lensed By Alexandra Nataf For Porter Edit

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Behati Prinsloo Steps Up For Rhinos in Namibia, Lensed By Alexandra Nataf For Porter Edit

Namibian model; Victoria’s Secret Angel; mom to two-year-old Dusty and 11-month old Gio; and Mrs. Adam (Maroon frontman) Levine, Behati Prinsloo covers the January 2019 issue of Porter Edit. Morgan Pilcher styles Behati in earth-color, utilitarian luxury outerwear and casual looks for ‘The Wild One’, lensed by Alexandra Nataf. Behati shares her thoughts and experiences in her own words.

Born and raised in Namibia, Behati Prinsloo left her country to pursue modeling at age 15. While she hasn’t looked back, Behati has always maintained her ties to her home continent and country, influenced now by her friend Doutzen Kroes to join the animal conservation movement. Doutzen is well-known for her work with elephant charities, and she put Prinsloo in touch with Save The Rhino Trust in Namibia.

If our generation doesn’t try to end poaching, the rhinos simply won’t be there one day. I am so close to this land, it’s where I’m from. I’m going to do a film with the rhino trackers to try and shed light on the situation. If I only save one rhino it will still be worth it.

AOC and GlamTribal Design are well-versed on big game conservation, and while Prinsloo’s comments are spot on, the reality of the situation around poaching is so much more complicated.

Just last night I learned that there’s a new move to declare the 10,000 years extinct woolly mammoth an endangered species, cutting off the supply of mammoth ivory. Initially, many conservationists supported the move to keep mammoth ivory available, thinking it would take the pressure off elephant poaching. Because it’s nearly impossible to tell the difference between mammoth ivory and elephant ivory, international crime syndicates are now shipping illegal elephant ivory with legal mammoth ivory. There is no end to human greed for ivory.

Eye: Amber Valletta Wears Agnona's SS 2019 Vicuña Fabric Collection, Lensed By Ezra Petronio

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Eye: Amber Valletta Wears Agnona's SS 2019 Vicuña Fabric Collection, Lensed By Ezra Petronio

Supermodel Amber Valletta showcases key looks from Agnona’s Spring/Summer 2019 collection, lensed by Ezra Petronio.

Designer Simon Holloway dedicated the collection to artist American Joan Jonas, 82, previously honored in an exhibition at London’s Tate Modern. In this film, we see Jonas at work in New York.

Peru’s Vicuña Fabric Is Worth Its Weight In Gold

Key items in Agnona’s spring 2019 collection were made in vicuña, one of two wild South American camelids living in the high alpine areas of the Andes. Vicuña, along with the guanaco, is a relative of the llama. It’s believed to be the wild ancestor of domesticated alpacas, and it remains wild today.

Nearly hunted to extinction in the late 1980’s, the vicuña herds made a slow, steady comeback and are expanding today in the wild. Driven largely by their father’s adoration of the wool product, Sergio and Pier Luigi Loro Piana, the co-CEOs of Loro Piana, the Italian mill that was a part of the mid-century ‘Made in Italy’ movement and would eventually grow into one of the world’s largest producers of cashmere — and its biggest supplier of vicuña.

The fibers are collected using the chacu method of the Incas—a half-religious ceremony where the local community forms a human chain around the animals, slowly closing the circumference of their circle for shearing. An adult vicuna produces only about a pound of fiber a year, producing a cloth so fine it was considered to be cloth of gold, writes BofF.

For The Incas, Vicuñas Had Strong, Spiritual Powers