GLAMTRIBALE Twin Serpents Ecstatic Goddess Pendant Honors Women's Ancient History

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GLAMTRIBALE Twin Serpents Ecstatic Goddess Pendant Honors Women's Ancient History

Ancient cultures recognized that sexual energy is our creative and vital life force energy, but with the demise of the goddesses, and the rise of monotheism and patriarchy, women's status changed dramatically. Woman -- or Eve in the case of Christianity -- was responsible for the downfall of humanity because she succumbed to the devil's temptation. This entire topic interested me as a second wave feminist and led in my early 20s to reading the work of Wilhelm Reich, an Austrian doctor of medicine and one of the prominent second generation of analysts after Sigmund Freud. 

The controversial research and clinic work of Dr. Wilhelm Reich has always held a prominent place in my understanding of human nature and women's history. But an experience with kundalini energy in the summer of 2017 brought Reich's research front and center in my mind, as I created GLAMTRIBALE's Twin Serpents Ecstatic Goddess Pendant. 

Dr. Reich called the life force energy that became the focus of his research 'orgone energy' and he believed that it was an energetic connection shared by living beings, one essentially identical to 'chi'. As a student of Freud's theories around neurosis, Reich believed that traumatic experiences blocked the natural flow of life-energy in the body, leading to physical and mental disease. His arguments caught the attention of American authorities at the FDA when Wilhelm Reich concluded that the libidinal-energy that Freud discussed was the primordial-energy of life itself, connected to more than just sexuality. Orgone was everywhere and Reich measured this energy-in-motion over the surface of the earth with a machine he invented called.

It was truly ironical that in 1939 Reich had emigrated to the US, fleeing the Nazis' burning of his books. In 1956 and 1950, the US government's multiple agencies from the FDA to the FBI rose up against him, burning Reich's scientific books and journals, and leaving him to die in a federal prison in 1957.

In the last decade, top researchers at institutions like Harvard have gained access to Reich's research papers and have worked to duplicate his work on orgone energy. A multi-year-crowdfunded project to produce a documentary on Reich has just been completed.

In 2017 I embarked on a series of four Daily Om courses that had a tremendous impact on my behavior and wellbeing. I had my first experience with Kundalini energy, an incredible event that prompted me to read this excellent this excellent article about the sacred sexual energy of the Goddess. More.

Goddess Hathor's Fifth Dynasty Priestess Hetpet's Tomb Unveiled A Century After Discovery In Egypt

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Goddess Hathor's Fifth Dynasty Priestess Hetpet's Tomb Unveiled A Century After Discovery In Egypt

Archaeologists working in Egypt have discovered a 4,400-year-old tomb close to Cairo, one that contains rare wall paintings and is thought to be the tomb of a priestess named Hetpet. Mostafa Waziri, the secretary general of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, announced the discovery located near the Giza pyramids. 

“The tomb is in very good condition,” Dr. Waziri said. “There are colored depictions of traditional scenes: animals grazing, fishing, bird-catching, offerings, sacrifice, soldiers and fruit-gathering.”

Hetpet is believed to have been close to Egyptian royals of the Fifth Dynasty, part of a prosperous period in Egyptian history known as the Old Kingdom during which the pyramids, temples and palaces were built under the rule of pharaohs. Hetpet served as a priestess for Hathor, a goddess depicted as a cow and associated with fertility, motherhood and love. By this time in women's history, female priests were not that common in ancient Egypt, but Hathor's priesthood was an exception. 

Hetpet's name was first seen on antiquities uncovered at the site in 1909 by a British explorer who sent them to Berlin and Frankfurt.  The tomb itself was not unearthed until more than a century later in 2017

Venice Biennale Explores Female Archetypes, Goddesses & Witches In Iraqi & Irish Pavillions

Mother goddess, presumed to be a Fertility goddess. Returned from Holland in 2010. 5,000 BCE. Courtesy Iraq Museum; Department of Antiquities, Ministry of Culture, Tourism and Antiquities; and Ruya Foundation.

Mother goddess, presumed to be a Fertility goddess. Returned from Holland in 2010. 5,000 BCE. Courtesy Iraq Museum; Department of Antiquities, Ministry of Culture, Tourism and Antiquities; and Ruya Foundation.

In an interesting juxtaposition of women's history and art and contemporary events, Iraq and Ireland are both channeling feminine archetypes at the 2017 Venice Biennale. 

Iraq

The Ruya Foundation, organizer of the Iraqi pavilion at Venice, is sending a total of 40 ancient Iraqi artifacts, some of them looted and now returned. The antiquities will reside alongside works by eight modern and contemporary Iraqi artists and a new commission by Francis Alÿs, who held art workshops at an Iraqi refugee camp last year.

The ambitious exhibition, titled “Archaic,” will inspire a dialogue between the modern and contemporary works and antiquities loaned by the Iraq Museum spanning six millennia, from the Neolithic Age to the Neo-Babylonian Period.

Ireland

Artist Jesse Jones will represent Ireland at the May 57th Venice Biennale, with her presentation 'Tremble Tremble', curated by Tessa Giblin. The 1970s chant was sung by women in the Italian Wages for Housework movement: “Tremate, tremate, le streghe sono tornate!” (tremble, tremble, the witches have returned!).

Even though the Catholic Church remains dominant in Ireland, there is a rising social movement demanding change between church and state. In 'Tremble, Tremble', the artist calls for a return of the witch as a "feminist archetype and disrupter" with an inherent ability to affect change. 

The artwork envisions a different legal order, "one in which the multitude are brought together in a symbolic, gigantic body, to proclaim a new law, that of 'In Utera Gigantae' writes ArtNet

Jones has researched the ways in which the law transmits memory over time, with a research combining an archeological dig of 3.5 million-year-old female specimen, the oppression of women during the 16th century witch trials, the symphysiotomy (a brutal form of caesarean) trials, and the legalisation of abortion in Ireland.

The film work takes testimony, statements, and written lyrics, blending them into a powerful incantation. The artist is collaborating with theatrical artist Olwen Fouéré and sound artist Susan Stenger to make an “expanded form of cinema.”

Jesse Jones,  Tremble Tremble  (2017) production image. Photo Ros Kavanagh.

Jesse Jones, Tremble Tremble (2017) production image. Photo Ros Kavanagh.

Eye | Behati Prinsloo In 'Seminole Spirit' By Russell James Opens Feb 17 At NYC Stephan Weiss Gallery

Behati Prinsloo In ‘Seminole Spirit’ By Russell James Opens Feb 17 At NYC Stephan Weiss Gallery

Apart from the photos of Prinsloo, the exhibit will also present a film featuring spoken word from the spiritual leader of the Seminole Tribe, a fine art photography exhibition from Bobby Henry that includes portraits of tribe members, and the tribe’s cultural sites and landscapes.

Seminole Spirit is totally different than any type of normal shoot. This isn’t a project about fashion or trends, it is an art project with a really powerful story behind it,” Prinsloo says. “We were all so humbled to be in collaboration with the Seminole Tribe of Florida. […] This was definitely a project of passion for all of us with no shot count or designer label needed.”

Adds James, “I hope to engage people to look at this and understand this culture as not something that is gathering dust in the closet, but to realize that tribes and indigenous people are using culture to their great advantage, to maintain their identity.”

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Anne adds:

Describing her experience with the Seminole people, Behati Prinsloo says: “We painted my body gold as we tried to capture an idea we had of what ‘Seminole Spirit’ is . . I felt like a savage swamp mermaid on Seminole land, crazy.”

In describing herself as a mermaid, Behati channels the key theme of female goddess history, establishing herself in the sisterhood of Mami Wati’s born in Africa before travelling the globe — often on the slave ships as a source of comfort and solace in brutal conditions.

AOC is dancing as fast as we can on this one, because ‘Seminole Spirit’ goes to the very essence of our identity and purpose. Lots more is coming. ~ Anne

Eye 2-2-15 | Mami Wata Resurgence As Global Goddess | 55,000 Years-Old Female Skull Provides Critical Link In Human Evolution & Migration Out of Africa