Solange Knowles Writes Love Letter From Jamaica, Lensed By Jackie Nickerson For Dazed Magazine | Archives

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Solange Knowles Writes Love Letter From Jamaica, Lensed By Jackie Nickerson For Dazed Magazine | Archives

Talent Solange Knowles is styled by Katie Shillingford in ‘Runaway Bay’, lensed by Jackie Nickerson for Dazed Magazine Spring/Summer 2018. Knowles pens a seven-part thank you and reflection on Jamaica. She begins:

I’ve been following Joni. First through her words, then through her truth, then through her melodies and the way I dance and drown in them. Then through her jazz, through chords that ease themselves into one another without ever showing their shadows. Through her exodus. To Topanga, and then to Laurel, and now to Runaway Bay, without even trying to find her.

I’ve been looking at photos of this house in Runaway Bay for five years. Wanting to know if it could tell my secrets. If it could hold me. If I could write music, and drink wine, and draw sketches, and sleep well naked and invent new ways to say how I feel. If I could burn my sage, and wash my hands with Florida water right there on the porch until I feel renewed. 

Solange was referencing legendary singer-songwriter Joni Mitchell who spent time in Jamaica, unable to sing or birth lyrics. Instead, writes Vogue, Mitchell painted on the walls of the bedroom of Itopia, a stone-walled house built in the 1600s as part of the Cardiff Hall estate on the North Coast of Jamaica.

Solange posted a now-deleted Instagram message: “Joni Mitchell painted murals in this house. I wrote songs in this house.”

The name ‘Runaway Bay’ comes not from the fact that this is a perfect getaway spot in Jamaica. That would be modern marketing. ‘Runaway Bay’ was an escape route for slaves The area is rich in caves, giving runaway slaves both shelter and secrecy as a place to regroup before choosing whether to remain on the island and move on. Read The Jamaica Maroons and the Danger of Categorical Thinking.

Another gift in the photo shoot is Shillingford’s choice of Paolina Russo’s athletic corset, worn on the cover. Russo won the prestigious L’Oreal Professionnel Young Talent Award at the Saint Martins BA fashion show in May 2018. She is now working on a Masters at Saint Martins, with industry eyes lasered on her prodigious talent and visionary future in fashion.

Eye: Central Saint Martin's Paolina Russo Is Poised For Mega Rise With Sexy, Fresh, Upcycled Fashion Vision

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Recent Central Saint Martins grad Paolina Russo won the school’s prestigious L’Oréal Professionnel Young Talent Award for a BA collection very timely in the #MeToo era. Russo imagines her sexy woman in up-cycled corsets made from deconstructed soccer cleats and balls, hockey helmets, and other gym-class staples. Russo won the prize for her ‘I Forgot Home’ in stiff competition that included 100 other students at Central Saint Martins, a school with an acceptance rate of 7%.

In 2016 Paolina Russo assumed the prestigious couture internship at Maison Martin Margiela under the creative direction of John Galliano. The designer was inspired by Russo's work and aesthetic citing her as a major inspiration in a conversation with Tim Blanks at the BOF "Voices" conference.

Eye: Dior Lady Art #3 Is 11 Women Artists Worldwide, Inspiring 2019 AOC Study of Their Extreme Talent

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Dior Lady Art #3 Is 11 Women Artists Worldwide, Inspiring 2019 AOC Study of Their Extreme Talent

Dior Creative Director Maria Grazia Chiuri launched her third Dior Lady Art project in early December 2018, at Miami’s Art Basel. For the first time, this third edition of the maison’s creative initiative, Dior Lady Art, is comprised of an all-woman cast of 11 artists transforming the classic Lady bag into works of art, The bags will now launch in January 2019 in expanded artistry by the same women at select Dior outlets worldwide. (See prior Dior Lady Art projects here. )

Earlier this week, Vogue.com profiled Danish jeweler and ceramist Jo Riis-Hansen, and her words got my attention. “I think the world is so fast,” says Riis-Hansen from her hometown, as her children, 10 and 6, play in the background. “I love fashion, I do, but it’s so fast. I think jewelry needs to slow down a bit, too. [When you buy a piece of jewelry] I think it’s important to [ask]: Where does it come from? Who is this person that made it? Did someone actually put real human or spiritual energy it? That doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t buy the fast-fashion [stuff], I’m just pursuing another way of making jewelry, one that [fulfills] a personal need for me, to be able to put all these emotions into [my work].”

In our fast-paced, digital and often disposable world, we rarely understand the answers to Riis-Hansen’s questions. Yet, it’s well known that younger people, in particular, are very focused on these questions about the projects they are buying into.

It’s my intention to answer these questions around my own GlamTribal Design Collection. But after installing this rather laborious entry around Dior Lady Art handbags, it occurs to me that we have a wonderful foundation from which to explore these women artists — their work, their philosophies around art, life, politics and all related topics. We can track their exhibitions and their communities, the experiences that have informed their artistic visions in an ongoing project throughout 2019.

As opposed to this post being just another fashionable data bit in the glut of information on the Internet, we will slow down a bit and really understand the women artists who were chosen by Dior Creative Director Maria Grazia Chiuri to represent this great luxury brand in its third Dior Lady Art initiative.

Ancient DNA Changes Everything We Know About The Evolution of Elephants

A study by Meyer et al reconfigures the elephant family tree, placing the straight-tusked elephant (Palaeoloxodon antiquus) closer to the African forest elephant (Loxodonta cyclotis), than to the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus), which was once thought to be its closest living relative. Image credit: Asier Larramendi Eskorza / Julie McMahon.

A study by Meyer et al reconfigures the elephant family tree, placing the straight-tusked elephant (Palaeoloxodon antiquus) closer to the African forest elephant (Loxodonta cyclotis), than to the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus), which was once thought to be its closest living relative. Image credit: Asier Larramendi Eskorza / Julie McMahon.

Ancient DNA Changes Everything We Know About The Evolution of Elephants

By Julien Benoit, Postdoc in Vertebrate Palaeontology, University of the Witwatersrand. First published on The Conversation Africa.

For a long time, zoologists assumed that there were only two species of elephant: one Asian and one African. Then genetic analyses suggested that the African Elephant could be divided into two distinct species, the African Forest and African Savannah elephants.

Now a new elephant has been added to the mix. The palaeoloxodon antiquus has been extinct for 120 000 years. This elephant roamed Europe and western Asia during the last ice age, about 400 000 years ago. A study of its DNA shows that this supposedly European animal is actually the African forest elephants’ closest relative. Another study by the same team found that at a genetic level, it may even have more in common with the modern African forest elephant than the African savannah elephant.

This study changes everything we thought we knew about the evolutionary history and ancestry of modern elephants and their closest relatives. It also shows that the African elephant’s lineage was not confined to Africa; the animals actually went out of the continent, which we didn’t know before. It roamed Europe and – through a lot of interbreeding – left its genetic mark far from its original stomping grounds.

The new find, based on DNA from fossils found in Germany, may also shed light on a DNA discrepancy that has puzzled scientists for some time.

EYE: Misty Copeland + Calvin Royal III By Albert Watson For Pirelli 2019 Calendar | Misty On Offering New Black Role Models

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EYE: Misty Copeland + Calvin Royal III By Albert Watson For Pirelli 2019 Calendar | Misty On Offering New Black Role Models

AOC drops into Vogue Italia as Misty Copeland, the first African American Principal dancer of the American Ballet Theater, talks about her appearance in the 2019 Pirelli calendar. Photographer Albert Watson pairs Copeland with Calvin Royal III, an ABT soloist since 2017 . Valentina Bonelli interviews Misty about her battles to bring diversity into the world of classical ballet.

Misty Copeland has long articulated the intense degree of racism embedded in classical ballet in America and across the world. George Balanchine imposes a singular vision of a ballet dancer as a person with light skin and the lithe, ultra-low BMI body of a teenager.

Copeland speaks to Vogue Italia of the social media criticism of her with words that ring true to those hurled at tennis great Serena Williams. The bodies of both black women are unsuitable for greatness with their too developed muscles, abundant breasts and dark skin tweet the social media harassers.

Grateful for former president Barack Obama giving her a White House platform to join creators in advancing an expanded vision of black talent in the arts, Copeland believes that the momentum has established new roots in black communities — in spite of the Trump effect.

Raf Simons Leaves Calvin Klein | Brand Won't Show During New York Fashion Week

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Raf Simons Leaves Calvin Klein | Brand Won't Show During New York Fashion Week

On Friday the Belgian designer Raf Simons and Calvin Klein announced that they were parting ways amicably eight months before his contact was up for renewal. Calvin Klein will not show during New York fashion week.