Burberry Agrees 'Suicide isn't fashion', Apologizes For Parading Lynching Noose Down Runway

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Burberry Agrees 'Suicide isn't fashion', Apologizes For Parading Lynching Noose Down Runway

Add another “what were they thinking!!!” designer must-have to your Fall 2019 luxury shopping list. Insisting that the design was inspired by a marine theme that ran throughout the entire collection, Burberry agrees that their noose is easily understood as making both suicide and lynching fashionable. Given everything that’s happening around Gucci and Prada’s wild-side walk with blackface, it’s pretty incredible that these mishaps keep happening.

"We are deeply sorry for the distress caused by one of the products that featured in our A/W 2019 runway collection," Marco Gobbetti, Burberry chief executive officer, said in a statement provided to CNN.

The design was criticized by model Liz Kennedy, who wore it on the runway and claims that her expressed concerns about the noose were dismissed. Even wearing it during the show potentially put Kennedy in her own tough spot with social media. It was Kennedy who posted this message to Burberry on her Instagram:

Why the Catholic Church Is So Slow To Act In Sex Abuse Cases: 4 Essential Reads

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Why the Catholic Church Is So Slow To Act In Sex Abuse Cases: 4 Essential Reads

By Kalpana Jain, Senior Religion + Ethics Editor. First published on The Conversation

The Vatican’s retired ambassador to the United States, Carlo Maria Vigano, has accusedPope Francis and other officials of covering up that they were aware of sex abuse allegations against Theodore McCarrick, a former archbishop of Washington.

The accusation follows a grand jury report in Pennsylvania that revealed a long and shocking scale of sex abuse in the Catholic Church. Francis, who accepted McCarrick’s resignation last month, after an investigation found the allegations to be credible, has refused to comment on Vigano’s letter.

Virginie Viard, Intimate Friend, 30 Yr. Lagerfeld Collaborator Takes The Reins Of Chanel

Virginie Viard, Intimate Friend, 30 Yr. Lagerfeld Collaborator Takes The Reins Of Chanel

Virginie Viard, director of the Chanel Fashion Creation Studio and Karl Lagerfeld's closest associate for more than 30 years, has been chosen by Alain Wertheimer (co-owner of Chanel) to replace the designer who died today February 19, 2019. Wertheimer believes her appointment will ensure the creation of new collections that advanceto the legacy of Gabrielle 'Coco' Chanel and Karl Lagerfeld.

As director of the fashion studio, Viard currently supervises ready-to-wear, Haute Couture, as well as the Croissière collection and the Métiers d'arts colelction, which showcases all the French craftsmanship. 

Viard has been "somewhat of an enigma" to those outside the world of fashion, although she has stepped into the light a bit more in recent years. Lagerfeld clarified that Viard was allowed to use the informal French ‘tu’ instead of ‘vous’ in her interactions with the deceased designer. “Our relationship is fundamental — one of profound affection and a true friendship,” Lagerfeld told The Telegraph.

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Karl Lagerfeld's Death Prompts Industry Accolades | Lagerfeld's Editorial, Advertising + Commentary Archives

Karl Lagerfeld's Death Prompts Industry Accolades |  Lagerfeld's Editorial, Advertising + Commentary Archives

Those Who Knew Karl Lagerfeld Best Share Thoughts About A Fashion Industry Great

Tributes are pouring in for Chanel creative director and fashion industry superstar Karl Lagerfeld, appearing here with his darling cat Choupette. AOC has a complicated history with Lagerfeld, having stood for my free press rights with his press representative. . . and not merely in email.

These tributes and commentary should stand as testimonials to the designer’s enormous body of work, articulated primarily by the people who loved and respected him.

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Eye: Liu Wen + Vittoria Ceretti Headline Tod's SS 2019 Campaign, Lensed By Craig McDean As Tod's Sales Freefall

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Eye: Liu Wen + Vittoria Ceretti Headline Tod's SS 2019 Campaign, Lensed By Craig McDean As Tod's Sales Freefall

Top models Vittoria Ceretti + Liu Wen are styled by Fabien Baron for Tod’s Spring/Summer 2019 campaign, lensed by Craig McDean.

Tod’s, which also owns the Hogan and Vivier brands, has built a billion-dollar business selling chic leather loafers worn by royals and Hollywood stars, WSJ wrote last Friday. But the high-end artisan brand is struggling for relevance among younger consumers. Compared to the on-fire Italian brand Gucci, Tod’s is not on the radar for younger shoppers, generating new growth and even financial stability for luxury brands.

The brand gets less than 15% of its revenue from millennials, compared with 33% for Louis Vuitton, more than 50% for Gucci and 65% for Saint Laurent, according to investment bank UBS estimates.

“We aren’t going to chase millennials,” Diego Della Valle, Tod’s chairman and majority shareholder, said in the WSJ interview at his villa in Casette d’Ete, a small town on Italy’s Adriatic coast. At most, he says, Tod’s is aiming at the older end of the age group, currently ranging from 23 to 38 years old: “We want to get our clients when they’re 35 years old and then keep them.”

Net income at Tod’s has declined for five straight years, after previously advancing every year for a decade. The stock has sunk 70% since 2013 and is hovering near a 10-year low.  Diego Della Valle insists that selling out to LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton, Kering Co. or newly-named Capri Holdings (previously Michael Kors Holdings) is not on his radar.